Who’s Doing Good?

27 May 2019 - 9 June 2019

THE GIVERS

Donations by Chinese philanthropists up by 50 percent in 2018. According to the China Philanthropy List, released annually by the China Philanthropy Times, the volume of donations by Chinese philanthropists and enterprises hit a record high of ¥27.63 billion (approximately US$4 billion) in 2018. China Daily reported that this is a 50 percent increase from the previous year. Donations were made by 744 philanthropic enterprises and 274 philanthropists, with donations from individual philanthropists totaling ¥9.53 billion (approximately US$1.4 billion). Although the majority of charitable giving in China comes from private corporations, the country’s philanthropy boom has encouraged more wealthy donors to participate. The recent increase in charitable giving by individual philanthropists has also been highlighted in the Hurun Report’s Hurun China Philanthropy List 2019.

Disney in India makes donation to aid Cyclone Fani relief efforts. Disney in India has donated ₹20 million (approximately US$300,000) to aid Cyclone Fani relief efforts. The money will be donated to Save the Children in India to support disaster response and provide resources for affected communities in the Indian state of Odisha. A Disney India representative said this donation will support families affected by Cyclone Fani by providing them with critical shelter. The country manager of Disney and Star India Sanjay Gupta stated, “Our hearts go out to those affected by this severe cyclonic storm Fani. The families and communities impacted by this devastating calamity need our support as they begin to rebuild.” Disney and Star India had also supported disaster response efforts in August 2018, aiding those affected by the Kerala floods.

THE THINKERS

Philanthropy in Singapore goes mainstream. Singapore is one of the top givers among its regional counterparts, and The Business Times article highlights the transformation of the country’s philanthropy landscape over the past few years. Citing CAPS’ Doing Good Index 2018, the article underscores Singapore’s position in the “Doing Well” cluster, leading in the index alongside Japan and Taiwan. Singapore’s favorable tax deduction policies and relatively simple registration process are among several factors which have helped boost the country’s performance in the index. But in the face of persistent social and environmental challenges, philanthropy needs to take a more solutions-focused approach to giving. While the upward trend is promising, philanthropy in Singapore still has room to improve.

Harvard course helps next-generation philanthropists do good. A course titled, “Impact Investing for the Next Generation,” convenes heirs to some of the world’s greatest family fortunes. The course, run jointly by Harvard and the University of Zurich in collaboration with the World Economic Forum, has been equipping next-generation philanthropists to be more impactful since 2015. For some of Asia’s wealthiest millennials, inculcating a culture of impact investing is a formidable challenge. Despite holding one-third of global wealth, Asia only contributes a small portion of its total wealth to impact investing. However, notable alumni, such as Hyundai heir Kyungsun Chung who co-founded Root Impact, have worked to promote a culture of impact investing in Asia since taking the course.

THE NONPROFITS

Myanmar nonprofit to give 10,000 bikes to students in need. Following the collapse of bike-sharing companies ofo and oBike in Singapore and Malaysia, many bikes have been left unused in scrapyards or warehouses. Lesswalk, a Myanmar nonprofit, bought 10,000 bikes from the failed bike-sharing companies to give to students in need. The total cost of buying, shipping, and refurbishing the bikes is between US$350,000 and US$400,000, but half is expected to be paid by sponsors. More than 3,000 bikes have already been shipped to Myanmar to be given to students, and the rest is expected to arrive by the end of June. Lesswalk founder Mike Than Tun Win stated, “This movement is not about buying a new bicycle, which is actually a very straightforward process. It solves a waste problem and gets new bikes for needy children at a cheaper price.”

THE BUSINESSES

Singapore’s Temasek sets up Asia-focused private equity fund for impact investing. Temasek Holdings, a Singaporean investment company, has established ABC World Asia under its philanthropic arm Temasek Trust. Headquartered in Singapore, ABC World Asia is a private equity fund dedicated to impact investing, primarily in South Asia, South-east Asia, and China. Chief executive officer of ABC World Asia David Heng highlighted the opportunities for impact investing in Asia, where the industry is still nascent. Heng stated, “The complex social and environmental challenges in our region present the potential for investors to achieve substantial impact.” The new impact investment fund will allow Temasek Trust to move beyond traditional grant-making to fulfill its mission of “ensuring sustainable funding for the long-term well-being and security of communities.”

Korea’s Hyundai Oilbank promotes culture of philanthropy. Korean petroleum and refinery company Hyundai Oilbank is aiming to promote a philanthropic culture among its staff. Through its 1% Nanum Foundation, more than 95 percent of the firm’s employees donate a portion or one percent of their monthly salary to charitable work. The foundation had raised about ₩11.2 billion (approximately US$9.5 million) in the last seven years to support its expanding number of charitable projects. One of the noteworthy projects, the “1% Nanum Lunch Room,” equips senior welfare centers across Korea with an annual meal plan of ₩50 million (approximately US$45,000). Other initiatives include providing heating oil for low-income families during the winter season and building schools and libraries in Vietnam and Nepal.

The Ritz-Carlton staff and guests raise funds for children with cleft conditions. International hotel chain The Ritz-Carlton raised close to US$450,000 for charities under the Smile Asia alliance. In May, over 10,000 staff and guests of The Ritz-Carlton hotels and resorts across Asia Pacific participated in the sales of over 14,600 cakes. The money raised will go to Smile Asia–a global alliance of independent charities working across Asia–which deploys medical volunteers to provide corrective and reconstructive surgeries for children living in remote areas. This annual fundraising initiative is part of the Smile Asia Week started by The Ritz-Carlton in 2014, and it has garnered great support over the years. In addition to this initiative, staff from the hotel chain can volunteer in medical missions across Asia Pacific.

THE INNOVATORS

China’s new model of blockchain-driven philanthropy. Stanford Social Innovation Review covers the rise of blockchain-driven philanthropy in China, and its role in ensuring transparency and accountability in the social sector. Blockchain enables donors to monitor the entire movement of their money and the platform, monitored by the public, ensures a trustworthy framework. Pioneers in blockchain-driven philanthropy in China include the charity platform of Alibaba’s fintech arm, Ant Love. Since adopting blockchain technology in March 2017, Ant Love has enabled 190 million Chinese individuals to donate US$50.5 million to 799 blockchain-supported projects. The decentralized, autonomous platform is breaking ground in the philanthropic sector as it encourages collaboration and employs community resources to address social challenges. While more oversight is still needed to monitor the people involved and the data that are recorded to the platform, China’s blockchain-driven philanthropy has significantly helped expand the sector’s role in Chinese society.

Indonesia leads by mainstreaming the SDGs in country’s development agenda. Indonesia’s integration of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) into national policies offers lessons for the rest of Asia. The Indonesian government has showcased its commitment to the SDGs by linking them to midterm national plans, aligning national budgets and tax policies with crucial SDGs. Indonesia recently implemented two financial programs in efforts to bridge the gap in financing the SDGs: SDG Indonesia One and Islamic Finance. Employing these two finance programs will help diversify funding sources by tapping into an array of investors. Additionally, the Indonesian government also recognizes the importance of decentralizing the implementation of SDGs across all levels of government and collaborating with key stakeholders to achieve the SDGs by 2030.

Who’s Doing Good?

15 April 2019 - 28 April 2019

THE GIVERS

Next-generation Asian philanthropists take an innovative approach to family foundations. Out of 146 countries and territories studied for the Charities Aid Foundation’s World Giving Index 2018, Hong Kong ranked 18th for charitable donations. Hong Kong family charities and foundations have long been generous givers, and the next generation is becoming more engaged and strategic in family giving. Cynthia D’Anjou-Brown, head of philanthropy and family governance advisory services at HSBC Private Banking, states, “Most younger donors don’t want to be seen as a money machine. They want to bring their skills and abilities to the table.” These second- and third-generation philanthropists are moving their family foundations beyond check-writing and underscoring a larger trend of a growing formalization of philanthropy in Hong Kong.

China increasingly a nation of givers through online and mobile platforms. Chinese philanthropy has grown and evolved significantly over the past decade, exemplified by the total amount of domestic giving quadrupling from 2009 to 2017. While a total of US$3.3 billion in public donations have been made by China’s top 100 philanthropists, ordinary individuals have become vital contributors through the expansion of digital payment platforms and artificial intelligence. Through popular online and mobile payment platforms like Alipay, users have easy access to various philanthropic activities including donating second-hand items, donating blood, and planting trees. With this expansion, it is critical that online and mobile platforms improve supervising mechanisms and enhance cross-platform collaboration to strengthen, manage, and prevent crises that could damage public trust in the charitable sector.

THE THINKERS

New report highlights Asia’s growing interest and momentum in sustainable finance. Although Asia historically lags behind global counterparts in social investment, innovations are emerging throughout the region. The past decade has seen more institutional investors broaden their portfolios, governments establish social investment funds and enact supportive legislation, and corporations engage in impact investing and social enterprise mentoring. This momentum is driven by recent developments such as the growth of the green bond market, the issuance of green sukuks, and the support of ESG funds by governments across the region. While Asian businesses, governments, and investors are becoming increasingly sophisticated in their impact initiatives, they must collaborate to address multidimensional challenges and to catch up with more developed markets such as the United States and Europe.

THE NONPROFITS

Hong Kong nonprofits building transitional homes to be exempted land charges. In an effort to lessen the financial burden on nonprofits and to encourage more community-initiated transitional housing projects, the Hong Kong government recently announced that charities that build transitional homes on private plots will be exempted from paying hefty land charges. According to the government statement, HK$2 billion (US$225 million) is also being set aside to support nonprofits in building transitional housing, and concessions will be given for other sites suitable for building transitional homes, such as vacant government sites and disused government premises. In Hong Kong, where the wait for public rental housing can be up to five-and-a-half years, transitional homes play a critical role in providing temporary relief for people stuck in poor living conditions.

THE BUSINESSES

Aloke and Suchitra Lohia speak with CAPS’ Chief Executive, Ruth Shapiro, on the launch of their IVL Foundation. Aloke Lohia, founder and CEO of Indorama Ventures (IVL), transformed a modest family business into a multi-billion-dollar international corporation. In addition to being one of the world’s largest manufacturers of wool, yarn, and polyester, Indorama is also one of the world’s largest recyclers of plastic and leverages its global operations to promote the circular economy. In conversation with Ruth Shapiro for Hong Kong Tatler, Bangkok-based tycoons Aloke and Suchitra Lohia discuss the company’s initiatives supporting education, economic development, women’s empowerment, healthcare, and social enterprises. Through the IVL Foundation, the couple aims to further create meaningful change through strategic philanthropy that amplifies impact and spreads value throughout the company and the communities they work with.

Japan-based Kao Corporation announces new global ESG strategy. Kao Corporation, whose brand portfolio includes Bioré, Goldwell, Jergens, John Frieda, and Molton Brown, recently announced its new global ESG strategy to promote a more sustainable way of living. The corporation’s “Kirei Lifestyle Plan” has set three bold commitments supported by 19 detailed leadership actions for the business to deliver by 2030. Kao aims to build upon the success of past initiatives, such as the adoption of refills and replacement packaging and the development of more compacted formulas, which together reduced the company’s plastic use in its packaging by 93,100 tons in 2018. For five years running, Kao has been selected for inclusion in the Dow Jones Sustainability World Index.

THE INNOVATORS

Jakarta-based investors weigh in on the difference between impact investors and traditional VCs. While tech-focused startups have the potential to create jobs and improve social welfare, there is debate on whether venture funds that invest in these startups should be labeled as social impact funds. There is difficulty in demarcating the boundaries of impact investors and VCs, but some practitioners encourage impact investors to differentiate themselves by justifying why they use that label, providing advice on measuring and monitoring impact, and investing where other people are not to close funding gaps. David Soukhasing, managing director at ANGIN, Tanisha Banaszczyk, investment manager at Convergence Ventures, and Melisa Irene, partner at East Ventures, weigh in on key characteristics that distinguish impact funds from their VC counterparts.

THE VOLUNTEERS

Healthcare workers, caregivers, and volunteers awarded for their work in Singapore. At the 16th Healthcare Humanity Awards organized by The Courage Fund, 83 people were recognized for their work in taking care of the sick and elderly in Singapore. One of the four categories recognizes volunteers who provide care or commit personal time to helping the nominating healthcare, social, and community care organizations. From fundraising by running ultra marathons to helping sailors with physical disabilities, the work of local volunteers was celebrated at the ceremony, and medals and cash awards were given by Singapore’s President Halimah Yacob and Health Minister Gan Kim Yong.

THE TRUSTBREAKERS

Former mosque chairman jailed for siphoning SG$371,000 in donations. A former chairman of a mosque management board in Singapore was sentenced to jail for two years and three months for siphoning around SG$371,000 (approximately US$300,000) from donations over seven years. While delivering the sentence, District Judge Ong Chin Rhu highlighted that the use of the money was perhaps the most controversial aspect, as the former chairman had used some of the donations to pay off personal expenses and donated other large sums to charities for which he worked for and drew a monthly salary from. The judge underscored the detriment of any crime involving the misuse of charity funds and its consequent of public distrust in the charity sector as a whole.

Who’s Doing Good?

8 April 2019 - 14 April 2019

THE GIVERS

GS Group makes US$400,000 donation to help victims of recent Gangwon wildfire. In line with the GS Group chairman’s commitment to corporate social responsibility, GS Group affiliates have been engaging in various partnerships to address social needs. Last year, GS Retail signed a memorandum of understanding with the Ministry of the Interior and Safety to annually donate relief supplies worth ₩50 million (approximately US$40,000) and to transform GS25 convenience stores into emergency shelters during natural disasters. GS Retail quickly responded to the Gangwon wildfire that broke out earlier this month, teaming up with other relief organizations to provide emergency supplies to those who suffered from the wildfire. GS Group made an additional contribution to relief efforts with a ₩500 million (US$400,000) donation to Community Chest of Korea, the country’s largest welfare institution, to support the victims.

Xiaomi founder Lei Jun to give nearly US$1 billion to charity. The founder and CEO of Xiaomi, Lei Jun, is receiving a bonus of more than 636.6 million shares for his eight years of contributions to the company. The Chinese smartphone maker went public in Hong Kong in 2018, and based on the stock’s current price, Lei Jun’s shares amount to approximately US$961 million. Last Wednesday, Xiaomi stated in a regulatory filing that Lei Jun promised to donate all the shares to charitable purposes. This comes weeks after another fresh bequest of shares, worth around US$7.5 billion, was made by Wipro’s chairman, Azim Premji, to his philanthropic initiatives.

THE THINKERS

Indian philanthropy still faces limitations, but leaders in the field can pioneer change. Education programs continue to receive the majority of philanthropic funding in India, and some analysts have suggested that too much philanthropic funding has been going to the education sector to the exclusion of other important social issues, such as violence against women. However, the growing philanthropic infrastructure augurs well for enhanced information about and transparency of the nonprofit sector, allowing for underrepresented nonprofits to access more partnerships and opportunities. Leaders in the field, including academic centers such as The Center for Social Impact and Philanthropy at Ashoka University and prominent foundations such as the Azim Premji Foundation, are positioned to drive the discourse on more inclusive and impactful philanthropy.

THE NONPROFITS

Social impact app, TangoTab, launches at Singapore’s first food bank community event.  Founded in 2012 by entrepreneur Andre Angel, TangoTab is an app designed to serve the food-insecure, and it has donated over three million meals to partners in the United States. TangoTab has partnered with The Food Bank Singapore (FBSG), a registered charity that coordinates food donations with its network of over 300 nonprofits. The app was launched last week at Singapore’s first food bank community event, which fed 1,000 people. Every time a diner checks in to a partner establishment on the app TangoTab will make a donation to FBSG to feed a person in need. As studies show that seven in ten Singaporeans dine out for dinner and one in ten go to bed hungry every night, TangoTab will help the city take a step forward in assisting the food-insecure through its meal-for-a-meal platform.

THE BUSINESSES

Hilton Hotels Malaysia gives back to society. In a recent interview, the regional general manager of Hilton Hotels Malaysia, Jamie Mead, shared details of the group’s CSR initiatives that focus on education, youth development, and going green. Mead also highlighted the focus on functional CSR such as the hygienic recycling system implemented to avoid wasting the thousands of soaps that are thrown away every day. Of the ongoing CSR initiatives, Mead highlights the partnership with SK La Salle 2, Jinjang, to be especially meaningful to him as the close-knit relationships between the children studying at the school and the Hilton Hotels Malaysia volunteers greatly inspired him to continue giving back.

Tata Power trains farmers on sustainable agriculture. Exhibiting its commitment to the social development of local communities, Tata Power, India’s largest power generation company, recently trained over 950 farmers in 42 villages on sustainable farm practices. Under the Sustainable Agriculture Programme, landholding farmers were taught the best agricultural practices for staple crops, vegetables, and cash crops. The program also trained landless farmers to cultivate vegetables in their courtyards through a vertical farming program, helping tribal farmers in remote areas both raise their income and lead a healthier lifestyle with increased access to fresh vegetables.

Tata Trusts and Microsoft partner to empower handloom weaving communities. In an effort to rejuvenate handloom communities in the eastern and north-eastern parts of India, Tata Trusts and Microsoft will leverage each other’s strengths to provide business and communication skills, design education, and digital literacy to handloom weavers. The training will be delivered through Microsoft’s Project Sangam, a cloud solution for large-scale training programs with adaptive streaming and offline-mode learning, which empower communities to learn anytime and anywhere. In partnership with Tata Trusts, Microsoft aims to expand the program to the grassroots level and help weaving communities build a sustainable future. The chief program director of Tata Trusts stated, “Through this initiative, we want to empower artisans and bring them up to par making them competitive in the industry.”

THE INNOVATORS

BPI Foundation searches for promising social enterprises in the Philippines. The social innovation arm of the Bank of the Philippine Islands, BPI Foundation, has announced the launch of BPI Sinag Year 5. To widen the scope of its competition this year, BPI Sinag will hold roadshows in Davao, Iloilo, Pampanga, and Laguna. At each stop, social entrepreneurs will have the opportunity to present a seven-minute business pitch, and the top 40 most promising social enterprises will win an opportunity to participate in a boot camp that will include training on business strategy, marketing, operations, finance, organization, and human resources development. Ten social enterprises with the most promising business viability and social impact will be named as awardees of BPI Sinag, with the top one to five receiving PHP 500,000 (approximately US$10,000) and the top six to ten receiving PHP 100,000 (approximately US$2,000) in grants.

Asia Pacific region found to be the most optimistic on the future of ESG investing. A global survey by BNP Paribas of 347 institutional investors who have US$23 trillion in assets under management found that despite lagging behind other regions on sustainable investing, the Asia Pacific region is the most optimistic on the future of ESG investing. While the survey showed that Asia Pacific institutional investors only allocated 15% of funds to ESG investment, falling short of the 18% global level, over half of Asia Pacific investors stated that they would allocate up to 75% of their funds towards ESG by 2021. As green investment gains traction, the region is also set to see new job opportunities emerge as around 50% of Asia Pacific institutional investors plan to hire external ESG specialists, while only 34% of global counterparts expect to do the same.

THE VOLUNTEERS

Youth volunteers in Bangladesh lead the way on climate action. Bangladeshi State Minister of Youth and Sports, Zahid Ahsan Russel, recently participated in an interactive roundtable, “Youth 2030: Working with and for Young People,” organized by the United Nations in New York. At the event last Tuesday, the state minister commended the nation’s young volunteers, stating, “The youth, especially the volunteers, have been instrumental in Bangladesh’s efforts on disaster risk reduction in early warning of the cyclone and emergency evacuation, effectively reducing deaths and injuries from natural disasters.” The state minister also highlighted the leading role of youth in not only volunteering efforts, but also in taking charge of on-the-ground climate action and social media campaigns against climate change.

Who’s Doing Good?

1 April 2019 - 7 April 2019

THE GIVERS

Korean celebrities give generously to Gangwon wildfire victims. On Friday, President Moon Jae-in declared a state of national disaster over the wildfire that affected the counties of Goseong, Inje, and Sokcho and the cities of Gangneung and Donghae. In the following days, the President designated these areas as a special disaster zone, which funneled in state money to help victims and support recovery, and a number of public figures made donations to support the affected communities. The largest donor was singer IU with a ₩100 million (approximately US$90,000) donation to ChildFund Korea, an international welfare service organization’s Korean arm. Coming from a range of celebrities, including K-pop idols and athletes, donations to victims in Gangwon Province have totaled US$330,000 as of Saturday and have complemented government efforts to respond to the disaster.

Tata Trusts awards 361 scholarships to students of Jammu and Kashmir. A new scholarship program, launched this year by the Tata Trusts, has selected 350 applicants for a two-year scholarship to pursue degree and diploma courses in education. A spokesperson for the Tata Trusts stated, “The Trusts had conducted an exercise to find out which states would benefit the most through support in promoting teaching as a career. Jammu and Kashmir emerged as one of the top choices.” In addition, 11 fine arts students of the University of Kashmir have been selected for the Tata Trusts Students’ Biennale National Award. The Tata Trusts has been supporting higher education since 1892 with the founding of the J.N. Tata Endowment for the Higher Education of Indians, which was featured in CAPS’ report, “Giving Back to the Future: Scholarships for Higher Education.” This new annual scholarship underscores the Tata Trusts’ continued commitment to supporting higher education.

Azim Premji Foundation highlights the Wipro founder’s unwavering support and patience. With a strong belief that education is the fundamental non-violent way to bring about lasting social change, Azim Premji chose education to be a primary beneficiary of his philanthropic initiatives. Out of Premji’s initial dream of starting a liberal arts school in 1997 grew a philanthropic effort of around 2,000 people working in 50 districts across six Indian states and a university dedicated to education and development domains. CEO of the Azim Premji Foundation, Dileep Ranjekar, lauds the Wipro founder’s continued support for the foundation’s work, stating that Azim Premji’s ability to appreciate and accept the inordinately long cycle time for social and educational change has enabled the foundation to work towards its long-term vision of social and educational change across the nation.

THE THINKERS

China’s philanthropy to unlock great potential. China’s philanthropy sector has quadrupled over the last decade, and private wealth has been a critical contributor to this growth. Donations from private companies and corporate foundations have dominated philanthropic giving, followed by affluent individuals and other types of organizations such as government agencies and public institutions. A recent report, published by AVPN and the Rockefeller Foundation, pointed out that the overwhelming share of corporate giving and individual donations in China has been largely stimulated by a rising awareness of social responsibility, favorable corporate tax incentives, and the country’s Charity Law passed in March 2016. While the report cautioned some barriers in China’s philanthropy ecosystem, such as a limited number of intermediaries able to help in sophisticated areas of philanthropy and a lack of data transparency, it expressed optimism as Chinese philanthropy burgeons alongside cutting-edge technology and a thriving digital sector, both of which are sparking a greater public interest in charity.

THE NONPROFITS

Pakistani nonprofit’s CEO named on Forbes 30 under 30 Asia list of social entrepreneurs. The 28-year-old CEO of Seed Out, Zain Ashraf Mughal, secured a spot on the prestigious list of Asia’s top social entrepreneurs. Seed Out, a nonprofit crowdfunding platform that works to eradicate poverty through interest-free micro-financing, has raised over 600 entrepreneurs in four Pakistani cities and put at least 1,600 children into schools. According to the World Bank in Pakistan, 90% of the workforce is highly entrepreneurial but it is estimated that 80% of them cannot apply for a traditional loan. Through Seed Out, donors can support social entrepreneurs through donating or lending to projects listed on the nonprofit’s website, ultimately providing social entrepreneurs the tools, training, and support to bring about innovative solutions to social and environmental issues.

THE BUSINESSES

Citi Foundation and United Nations Development Programme host second Asia Pacific Youth Co:Lab Summit. On April 4th, the United Nations Development Programme and Citi Foundation collaborated with the Ministry of Science and Technology and the Viet Nam Volunteer Center to host the second Asia Pacific Youth Co:Lab Summit in Hanoi. The project is the largest youth-led social entrepreneurship movement driving the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals. The event brings together over 500 delegates, including hundreds of youth, partners, and government officials from 20 countries, to exchange ideas and experiences and to influence policy initiatives on youth entrepreneurship and social innovation. The initiative has benefitted over 2,500 young social entrepreneurs and has helped launch or improve nearly 500 social enterprises.

THE INNOVATORS

Fourteen young Indian social entrepreneurs make the Forbes 30 under 30 Asia list of social entrepreneurs. While the Forbes Billionaire List 2019 featured Indian business leaders including Mukesh Ambani and Azim Premji, a new cohort of young Indian leaders are being featured for their social-driven initiatives. Forbes Asia has released its annual Forbes 30 Under 30 Asia list, highlighting 300 outstanding individuals from 23 countries and territories in the Asia Pacific region. Fourteen young Indian social entrepreneurs were featured on the Forbes 30 under 30 Asia list of social entrepreneurs for their work, which ranges from collecting unused clothes to making sustainable construction bricks out of plastic waste. These young social entrepreneurs are tackling pressing social and environmental issues facing their communities and are a growing cohort of leaders in the burgeoning social entrepreneurship space.

Global impact investment market rises to US$502 billion. The Global Impact Investing Network (GIIN) conducted a comprehensive study analyzing the size and make-up of the impact investing market and launched their landmark report, “Sizing the Impact Investment Market.” GIIN reports that the global impact investment market is sized to be currently worth at least US$502 billion, which is more than double the US$228 billion reported by GIIN last year in its “2018 Annual Impact Investor Survey.” According to the report, the majority of impact investors are based in developed markets such as the US, Canada, and Europe, and a smaller fraction of investors are based in Asia with 2% of investors in East Asia, 2% in Southeast Asia, and 3% in South Asia. While the impact investment market has grown rapidly over the past decade, there is still a need for trillions of dollars to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, leaving significant room for the nascent impact investment sector to grow.

Villgro leads the way in supporting social enterprises through public-private partnerships. As India’s oldest and one of the world’s largest social enterprise incubators, Villgro has impacted over 19 million lives through its support for early-stage and innovation-based social enterprises. Since its founding in 2001, Villgro has been an exemplar of social enterprise incubation with its focus on deep sectoral expertise, high-touch mentoring, and public-private partnerships. Villgro has collaborated with the private sector, including Accenture and Rabobank, as well as with local and international governments to expand INVEST, one of the world’s largest social innovation programs. The incubator’s diverse partnerships serve as models for other intermediaries looking to bolster the social entrepreneurship ecosystem in their communities.

Who’s Doing Good?

25 March 2019 - 31 March 2019

THE GIVERS

Singaporean government to match donations given to registered charities. From April to March next year, donations to Institutions of a Public Character (IPCs), certified charities in Singapore, will be matched dollar for dollar through the new SG$200 million (approximately US$147.5 million) Bicentennial Community Fund. Each IPC will be entitled to up to SG$400,000 (approximately US$295,000), and the fund will be administered by the National Volunteer and Philanthropy Centre with support from the Ministry of Culture, Community and Youth. “Through the Bicentennial Community Fund, we hope to further encourage all Singaporeans to continue the philanthropic and community self-help spirit of our forefathers, 200 years on and 200 years forward,” said Grace Fu, Minister for Culture, Community and Youth.

THE THINKERS

Asian philanthropists have the potential to fuel the new model of philanthropy. As the Doing Good Index 2018 highlights, Asian philanthropists have the capacity to contribute US$500 billion in charitable giving. With recent economic growth comes the potential for a new era of charitable giving focused on seemingly intractable issues, and China is leading the way as it harnesses the highest number of millionaires engaged in environmental, social, and governance-related investing. As collaboration is strengthening with the development of consortiums and alliances, and a new generation of globally minded and mission-driven rich is taking the helm of the exponential growth in capital, Asia is positioned to fuel a new model of philanthropy that can make the biggest bets in bridging the US2.5 trillion funding gap needed to achieve the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals.

THE NONPROFITS

Hong Kong nonprofit helps residents with disabilities fight prejudice and break into the workforce. In Hong Kong, the poverty rate among people with disabilities in the city is more than twice the level of the general population. CareER, a local nonprofit dedicated to helping students and graduates with disabilities find jobs, is working to break down the barriers facing disabled jobseekers. After a few years working in human resources for multinational companies, Walter Tsui Yu-hang founded CareER in 2013 to help graduates with disabilities find suitable jobs instead of the low-skill work they are usually offered. CareER now has more than 450 members with disabilities and has worked with over 100 employers to create more than 200 jobs. In efforts to keep growing its impact, CarER launched a two-year career development program last week, sponsored by the Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust, which provides occupational skill training, consultation services, and leadership development.

THE BUSINESSES

Support from Alibaba Foundation empowers United Nations (UN) Women flagship programs. Two major initiatives of UN Women—Making Every Woman and Girl Count and Buy from Women—are receiving significant support from the Alibaba Foundation as part of its five-year, US$5 million commitment to UN Women. The Foundation’s contribution will help expand the Making Every Woman and Girl Count program in Asia, which seeks to bring about a radical shift in how gender statistics are used, created, and promoted at the global, regional, and country level. The Foundation’s contribution will also support the Buy From Women digital platform, which empowers women farmers in Liberia and the Democratic Republic of Congo to access new markets and services and increase production and revenues.

Cancer initiative benefits thousands of women in China. ”Make Up Your Life,” a project launched in South Korea in 2008, has provided free cancer-screenings and examinations for 54,000 women in China. Amorepacific, a South Korean cosmetics company, has invested ¥8 million over the past three years in the initiative, and according to a joint report published by China Women’s Development Foundation, free checkups for breast and cervical cancers for underprivileged women has received a positive social return on investment. Each ¥1 (US$0.15) spent in this project turned out a ¥1.52 worth of impact as the initiative effectively raised awareness of such diseases for women in remote areas where medical resources are scared. With enhanced awareness and access to screening, women can take early action for disease prevention and treatment, leading to enhanced general wellbeing of women and their families.

THE INNOVATORS

Female tech boss launches drive to empower women. Virginia Tan, co-founder of Lean in China, announced the launch of Nvying program for WeChat. Nvying is a short video platform for women to share their personal stories and communicate about their work life. The application is designed based on the needs of young women in China. “We wanted to do this because I think the market lacks quality content—there is a lot of entertainment and gossip, but we wanted to set a professional standard to answer some of the questions,” Tan said. According to Tan, the program will start with female users of the messaging platform, but later grow to include men as well.

China’s first charity store steps into 11th year in style. Chinese nonprofit, Roundabout, works to promote the eco-conscious lifestyle of the 3Rs—reduce, reuse, and recycle—with its free pick-up service over Beijing. In addition to this, the company opened China’s first charity distribution store to raise funds for vulnerable social groups (orphans, children with critical sicknesses or physical challenges, women, elderly, and earthquake victims) and to connect those who want help those in need. “We hope to create a charming place where people feel good and have a pleasant experience when they step inside—whether to buy a gift for a loved one or to find something they need—so they would like to come back,” said Charlotte Beckett, the charity’s volunteer director.

THE VOLUNTEERS

Two Cathay Pacific pilots raise money to buy rice for charity Feeding Hong Kong. Through a crowdfunding campaign, two Australian pilots, Glen Clarke, and Matthew Brockman, raised HK$10,000 (US$1,270) to buy rice for Feeding Hong Kong, a local charity that rescues edible food from producers, manufacturers, distributors, and retailers and redistributes it to other charities. Both Clarke and Brockman moved to Hong Kong four years ago, and after fundraising money for Australian foundations, they decided to give back to a Hong Kong charity this year. Clarke and Brockman were inspired to raise money to buy rice for Feeding Hong Kong after spending time at the charity’s warehouse in Yau Tong and noticing a lack of rice among the non-perishable food donations. While their campaign for Feeding Hong Kong extends till June, the duo is already brainstorming more ways to give back to the Hong Kong community.

THE TRUSTBREAKERS

Man held for forging charity commissioner’s signatures. The detection of crime branch in India has arrested a man for forging signatures and stamp of the charity commissioner and preparing bogus documents related to land in Bil village on the Vadodara city’s outskirts. In the process of selling a piece of land he did not actually own, the accused claimed that the land belonged to a temple trust and that he had bought it from them, producing bogus documents with the charity commissioner’s forged signatures and stamp.

Charity laws being enacted in all provinces across Pakistan. With the visiting delegation of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) in the country on Wednesday, various Pakistani government officials briefed the FATF on steps taken by Pakistan to curb money-laundering. The officials of the National Counter Terrorism Authority (NACTA) were also present on the occasion, briefing the FATF regarding laws on model charities and that laws on charities were being devised in all provinces.

Who’s Doing Good?

18 March 2019 - 24 March 2019

THE GIVERS

Bill Gates lauds Azim Premji for commitment to philanthropy. This past weekend, Bill Gates took to Twitter to acknowledge Wipro chairman Azim Premji and his most recent bequest of 34% of Wipro’s shares, worth about US$7.5 billion, to the Azim Premji Foundation. With this new charitable contribution, Premji has now donated a total of US$21 billion over the past several years to his philanthropic initiatives, making him one of the world’s top philanthropists. Since 2014, the Azim Premji Foundation has supported over 150 organizations engaged in improving the lives of disadvantaged, under-served, and marginalized communities in India. Gates tweeted, “I’m inspired by Azim Premji’s continued commitment to philanthropy. His latest contribution will make a tremendous impact.”

China’s new billionaire class gives rise to philanthropy boom. The 2019 report from the China Philanthropy program at the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation highlights driving forces that have fueled China’s philanthropy boom, including the country’s recent economic growth and laws and regulations that gradually legitimized and incentivized private giving. While the largest percentage of Chinese donors comes from the real estate sector, the report also highlights prominent Chinese philanthropists, including China’s richest man, Jack Ma, who recently announced he was retiring from his company to focus on education philanthropy. Beyond the givers, China’s maturing philanthropy scene has also spurred the growth of new philanthropic infrastructure, buttressed by intermediary organizations that gather data, facilitate peer learning, and train donors to be more strategic in their giving.

THE THINKERS

Southeast Asian business leaders must step up and invest in development efforts. While economists forecast Indonesia to become the world’s fourth-largest economy by 2050, the country still faces development and public health challenges, such as a high burden of tuberculosis. Dato’ Sri Dr. Tahir, chairman of Mayapada Group and founder of the Tahir Foundation, calls on private sector leaders to recognize their critical role in public health and development in emerging economies in Southeast Asia. While the efforts of a partnership between the Tahir Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and government public health services have helped Indonesia achieve a 44% decrease in TB mortality rates and 14% decrease in TB incidence rates from 2000 to 2017, the private sector can propel these efforts with financial support to expand access for all Indonesians to benefit from these resources and services.

Program trains rural women in India to raise healthier goats and gain financial independence. Extensive research shows that when women have control over finances, they are more likely to spend it in ways that improve the quality of life for their family. In rural India, goat rearing is an important source of income, managed almost exclusively by women, and the money from which is kept in their hands. Project Mesha, which is run by the Aga Khan Foundation and supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, trains more than 200 women to be “pashu sakhis” in four communities in Bihar – one of the poorest states in India and home to one of the country’s largest population of goats. By learning how to vaccinate, deworm, and provide other preventative care to goats in their community, women can increase their income by charging small fees for their veterinary services, promoting goat care in their communities, and reducing the loss of income due to the high mortality rate of goats. Through working with local women’s groups, the program aims to increase incomes for 50,000 of India’s poorest women by 30%.

THE NONPROFITS

Hong Kong NGO Leadership Programme nurtures social service network for the future. The nine-month NGO leadership program is a tripartite collaboration between The Chinese University of Hong Kong’s Department of Social Work, UBS, and Operation Santa Claus, one of the largest charitable donation drives in Hong Kong. The program aims to encourage more volunteering, nurture leaders in the social sector, and build a lasting network that will help with collaborative problem solving of social challenges in the future. The winning participant of each year’s program becomes a beneficiary of Operation Santa Claus, and past winners have been granted more than US$102,000 to invest in their service. Last year’s winner was Kenneth Choi Man-kin, the general manager of social enterprise Gingko House. Since its founding in 2015, the leadership program has trained 103 participants from 87 organizations and has helped kickstart numerous social service projects.

THE BUSINESSES

Global Wholesaler METRO to join forces with One Drop Foundation to provide safe water access and sanitation in India. On World Water Day, March 22, international wholesale and food specialist METRO launched the METRO Water Initiative in partnership with the One Drop Foundation. The joint initiative will collaborate with an array of actors on the ground including local governments, civil society organizations, and microfinancing institutions to provide permanent access to sustainable and safe water and sanitation to more than a quarter of a million people in India. The initiative will focus on supporting the northern District of Sheohar, in Bihar, India where nearly half of the region lacks safe water coverage. This project highlights the importance of collaboration as emphasized by Heiko Hutmacher, Chief Human Resources Officer and Member of the Management Board of METRO AG responsible for Sustainability, “By partnering for a common goal, we have the power to change the lives of more than a quarter of a million people for the better.”

Chairperson and CEO of Emperor Watch and Jewellery, Cindy Yeung, talks about the company’s charitable causes.  At the helm of the family business — one of Hong Kong’s most prestigious retailers — Cindy Yeung follows in the footsteps of her father and grandfather by giving back to the community through charitable initiatives with the company. In a recent interview, part of Hong Kong Tatler’s ‘The Next Step’ series that highlights Hong Kong-based philanthropic women, Yeung shares about her early inspiration from her father, Dr. Albert Yeung. Galvanized by his philanthropic work of founding the Emperor Foundation and the Albert Yeung Sau Sing Charity Foundation, she spearheaded new partnerships with charities including Plan International, Chi Heng Foundation, and Project We Can. In efforts to strengthen the company’s commitment to improving the education and health conditions of underprivileged children around the world Yeung also encourages staff to actively participate in their own way.

THE INNOVATORS

How socially responsible investing can help end modern slavery. While socially responsible investing has gained momentum around the world, the practice has focused more on environmental and governance issues, partly due to extensive data and indicators within these two streams. Unlike environmental metrics that have been developed to track global warming and deforestation, social impact metrics are still amorphous and underdeveloped. In the case of modern slavery, the market lacks a standardized set of quantifiable indicators that companies can use as a reporting standard and that asset managers can base their investments on. The development of more robust metrics to track social issues like modern slavery will be pertinent in paving the way for investors to have a more tangible impact, especially in Asia and the Pacific region where 62% of the estimated 40 million victims of modern slavery live.

Impact Investment Exchange (IIX) celebrates its 10-year anniversary with inaugural art competition and exhibition. Singapore-based Impact Investment Exchange, a pioneer in impact investing that focuses on empowering women, is celebrating its 10-year anniversary with its inaugural She Is More Youth Art Competition. The competition, which is headed by the organization’s IIX Foundation, aims to harness the power of art to give voice to women, and it will culminate in an exhibition set to open in May. Durreen Shahnaz, founder and CEO of IIX, highlighted that the event aligns with her vision for IIX, which is to provide “a chance for us to change the narrative of women as victims, to recognize them as solution-builders; to drive women’s empowerment by building opportunities for everyone to value and give voice to women.”

THE VOLUNTEERS

Young volunteers in India are on a mission to feed the poor. Robin Hood Army, a group of more than 270 young volunteers who are largely students and young working professionals, has been collecting surplus food from hotels, restaurants, and wedding halls to feed the hungry. Modeled on the Re-Food program in Portugal, which fights hunger at no-cost, the organization began working in Delhi, India in 2014 as a zero-funds organization – operating with no revenue, office space, or employees. To ensure food is reaching the communities most in need, the Robin Hood Army volunteers conduct location surveys to gauge the need for food, collecting data on the number of family members, the number of children in each family, and the family’s source of livelihood. From last September till now, the group of volunteers has conducted 154 food drives and has fed nearly 30,000 people.

Who’s Doing Good?

25 February 2019 - 3 March 2019

THE GIVERS

Jhunjhnuwala family shares philanthropic values inspired by late patriarch. Surya Jhunjhnuwala, founder and managing director of the Singapore-headquartered Naumi Hotels, discusses the strong spirit of giving instilled in his family by his late father, Shyam Sundar Jhunjhnuwala. He credits his father for teaching the family that philanthropy is a value to live by and not an afterthought, stating, “It should start from young, and anyone can do it regardless of their status or net worth.” Among the numerous selected causes the family supports, Rita Jhunjhnuwala, Surya’s wife, highlights the family’s commitment to supporting causes with a longer-term effect. The family continues its patriarch’s legacy and passion for education through eponymous initiatives, including the Shyam Sundar Jhunjhnuwala Charity Fund and the S.S. Jhunjhnuwala – Naumi Hotel Bursary at the Singapore Institute of Technology.

THE NONPROFITS

A new nonprofit, Lever for Change, aims to unlock billions of untapped capital for philanthropy through big bet contests. The success of the first iteration of the MacArthur Foundation’s 100&Change competition, a high-stakes philanthropy competition that offers a US$100 million grand prize to only one proposal, has led to the launch of the new nonprofit, Lever for Change. This new competition consultancy will pilot effective competition models that allow funders to place “big bets,” giving millions all to one cause, in an effort to make the biggest impact on one specific solution. Lever for Change is backed by US$20 million from the MacArthur Foundation and US$5 million from LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman, and several funders have already committed capital to be invested in ideas that are discovered by Lever of Change competitions.

Richard Hawkes from the British Asian Trust highlights three recommendations for charities engaging with social finance. The British Asian Trust, along with their partners, the Tata Trusts, UBS Optimus Foundation, The Michael and Susan Dell Foundation, Comic Relief, the Department for International Development, the Mittal Foundation, and British Telecom, recently launched the largest education development impact bond (DIB) in the world: Quality Education India DIB. Over four years, this DIB will aim to improve literacy and numeracy skills for more than 300,000 children, and ultimately help bridge the financial gap required to meet the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. Richard Hawkes, chief executive of the British Asian Trust, draws on his experience and encourages development organizations and charities wanting to engage with social finance to focus on patience, clear and realistic goals, and collaboration for success.

Women’s World Banking celebrates 40 years of helping low-income women become financially secure.. As the global nonprofit, Women’s World Banking, celebrates its 40th anniversary, Mary Ellen Iskenderian, the President and CEO, shares stories of the nonprofit’s work that underscore the importance of delivering banking services to low-income women. Women’s World Banking started out working with microfinance banks, but it has since expanded to work with mainstream banks and other businesses focused on distributing products to women in need. Iskenderian, featured on this week’s Business of Giving podcast, highlights the positive impacts of access to finance that the organization has witnessed being at the forefront of the financial inclusion movement for forty years.

Over 80% of social investments in microfinance.. Myanmar received 15 impact-investing deals, which is the second highest number in Southeast Asia, between 2007 and 2017, but received the second lowest amount of capital at US$ 26 million according to a report by AVPN. The report also highlights that 80% of the investments were in microfinance. APVN says that new legislation such as the new Companies Law and moves by the Central Bank of Myanmar to relax collateral requirements will improve financing for SMEs, while the recent wave of impact funds and development finance institutions entering Myanmar will give a boost to the country’s impact-investing market and growing social enterprises.

THE VOLUNTEERS

Beijing’s Palace Museum receives major donation from Hong Kong-based foundation. The NG Teng Fong Charitable Foundation has spent about ¥1.9 billion (approximately US$238 million) on charity programs that focus on healthcare, education, cultural heritage conservation, and environmental protection. Last week, the Hong Kong-based foundation donated ¥100 million (US$15 million) to the Palace Museum in Beijing. Mr. Shan Jixiang, director of the Palace Museum, shared that this donation will be dedicated to restoring the Palace of Prolonging Happiness, or Yanxi Gong, into an exhibition space displaying foreign cultural relics, and it is expected to open in 2020. Part of the foundation’s donation will also be used for a youth exchange programs as well as Hong Kong-related training programs on museum expertise.

THE BUSINESSES

Ctrip CEO, Jane Sun, visits Middle East refugee centers to seek further commitments. As a philanthropist and CEO of Ctrip, China’s largest online travel agency, Jane Sun exhibits a commitment to social responsibility at a global scale. In addition to donating to causes that help children suffering from the effects of war, Ms. Sun leads Ctrip Group in undertaking major philanthropic initiatives. Last year the company supported the CanDo project, which works with children’s hospitals in Syria; the Edesia project, which addresses malnutrition in western African countries; and the Syrian Paralyzed Children project, which provides artificial limbs to children injured in the Syrian Civil War. During this past Chinese New Year holiday, Sun visited refugee centers in Lebanon and Jordan to better understand how to support the region and refugee education in future philanthropic initiatives.

Alibaba Cloud launches Tech for Change initiative for social good. The initiative calls for innovative ideas, and joint efforts from enterprises, startups and young entrepreneurs to tackle global social and humanitarian challenges in areas including education, economic development, and the environment through the use of technology. The initiative reflects Alibaba Cloud’s long-held value of empowering the community through technology. Alibaba Cloud also built a technical philanthropy platform, “Green Code” in 2017 to connect professional IT volunteers with non-profit organizations in China for philanthropy programs. More than 3,000 engineers registered for charity programs from 168 organizations in 2018.

Hurun Rich List: Bezos stays strong on top, while 23 other Indians join the club. The Hurun report, research, media, and investment business best known for its ‘Hurun China Rich List’, a ranking of the wealthiest individuals in China came out with this year’s rankings. Jeff Bezos, founder, and CEO of Amazon made it to the top for a second year. This year also saw Reliance India Limited Chairman, Mukesh Ambani make it to the top 10. The report also highlighted that China lost the maximum number of billionaires – 213, followed by India with 52. Women made up 15.5% of the list, similar to last year’s 15.3%.

Founder’s values play a key role in driving family business philanthropic philosophy. Different family business philanthropy models have emerged over the years, ranging from foundations to corporate social responsibility initiatives. Building off a long tradition of giving, family businesses in India are increasingly pursuing hybrid models, like that of the Tata Trusts, in which families set up a charitable foundation that is funded by dividends from the business. A 2016 report by EY found that the founder’s values play an especially important role in driving family business philanthropy as it brings family members together in supporting their selected cause. While annual lists, like Forbes Asia’s Heroes of Philanthropy, include top Indian philanthropists every year, another trend stands out in India: big philanthropists are usually quiet about their work and impact.

Who’s Doing Good?

11 February 2019 - 17 February 2019

THE GIVERS

Asia’s second wave of philanthropists favoring hands-on approaches to philanthropy. Second- and third-generation philanthropists from wealthy families in North Asia are transforming the philanthropy landscape as they pursue different practices than those of their parents. The findings are part of a report published by Stanford Social Innovation Review. The report adds that these philanthropists not only prefer managerial models of governance but also demonstrate greater interest in social enterprise and social value investment models. Kyung Sun Chung in Korea, Daisuke Kan in Japan, and Allen Liang in China are leading examples of philanthropists working to build strong ecosystems for social entrepreneurship and social innovation in their countries.

Donation from Mitsubishi Motors’ STEP Fund helps build new school building in the Philippines. Voluntary donations from employees at Mitsubishi Motors to the company’s STEP Fund, matched with an equivalent contribution by the company, amounted to a ¥3 million (approximately US$27,000) donation to build a classroom building at Camayse Elementary School in the Philippines. As the company builds its presence across the ASEAN region, it has committed to stronger CSR efforts in the local communities where it operates. The project was conducted by the World Vision Development Foundation in the Philippines, and construction of the new classroom building was completed in January 2019.

THE THINKERS

Bill and Melinda Gates publish annual letter highlighting surprises in philanthropy in 2018. In their 2019 letter, titled, “We didn’t see this coming,” the couple highlights nine surprises they encountered through their foundation’s philanthropic work. These range from gender gaps in global data and mobile phone ownership to the potential of at-home DNA tests. The couple underscores the important role such surprises have played in their philanthropic journey, stating, “A benefit of surprises is that they’re often a prod to action.” While these new discoveries have stirred curiosity and concern at the Gates Foundation, the couple concludes their letter with optimism and confidence in the power of innovation to address extant and emerging issues.

Oxford study recommends crowdfunding for financing UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Crowdfunding has grown significantly in the Asia-Pacific region in the last few years – it helped raise US$103 billion in the region in 2016. However, a new study by the University of Oxford’s Saïd Business School highlights that only US$165 million of these funds were donations, which pales in comparison to the U.S. which despite raising only US$35 billion, received nearly twice as much in donations (US$339 million). According to UN estimates, achieving the 17 highly ambitious Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 will cost around US$5 trillion to US$7 trillion a year, about US$4 trillion of which is required in developing countries. The report also highlights the potential of SDG-related crowdfunding platforms to encourage social entrepreneurs with opportunities for match-funding by corporations, foundations, and governments.

THE NONPROFITS

Women Who Code partners with VMware to retrain 15,000 women for tech jobs in India. VMinclusion Taara is a joint initiative of Women Who Code (WWCode), an international nonprofit that inspires women to succeed in the tech industry, and VMware, a computer software subsidiary of Dell Technologies. The VMinclusion Taara initiative was formed to train and upskill 15,000 women in India who have left the tech industry. According to estimates, 45% of women working in tech normally quit the industry after 8 years. This program, which creates a path of re-entry for women through free training and certification on advance digital transformation solutions, will be WWCode’s biggest reskilling and back-to-work initiative.

THE BUSINESSES

KKR’s global impact fund co-invests with KKR Asia’s Fund in Ramky Enviro Engineers Limited. Investment firm KKR has acquired a 60% stake in Ramky Enviro Engineers Limited (REEL), a leading provider of environmental services in India and overseas, for approximately US$510 million. The investment is a part of KKR’s Global Impact strategy, which focuses on identifying and investing in businesses with positive social and environmental impact that contribute to the SDGs. KKR’s Global Impact strategy will build upon the firm’s expertise in environmental issue management and REEL’s experience in environmental management to innovate and provide critical solutions to reduce pollution and improve sanitation infrastructure worldwide.

THE INNOVATORS

Singapore’s vibrant social innovation ecosystem rooted in strong public-private-people collaborations. Singapore’s government recognizes that cross-sector partnerships are needed for an ecosystem that supports innovation and social impact. Its efforts to boost the sector’s growth have been buttressed by intermediary organizations that are improving cross-sector coordination and Singapore-based private investment networks that are connecting social businesses with global partners and investors. Universities in Singapore are also contributing to new curricula and experiential learning programs that promote social business values and social entrepreneurship. This commitment from Singapore’s government, businesses, and universities to social responsibility is transforming business culture and positioning the country to be a leading force in social innovation.

THE VOLUNTEERS

A partnership between Standard Chartered Bank and volunteer organization, RSVP Singapore, to create more volunteer opportunities for seniors. In Singapore’s aging population, silver volunteerism has been gaining attention as the number of Singaporeans aged 65 is expected to double by 2030. The three-year partnership seeks to tap into this growing pool of seniors with a wealth of skills and experience through initiatives such as an inter-generational volunteering program. The collaboration will also train senior volunteers to help conduct health tasks and mindfulness practices as part of a nationwide expansion of a pre-dementia program. As other countries in the region face aging societies, innovative engagement and intergenerational programs can integrate the growing population of skilled and experienced seniors in efforts to create social impact and serve local communities.

Who’s Doing Good?

04 February 2019 - 10 February 2019

THE GIVERS

Mukesh Ambani tops Hurun India Philanthropy List 2018. From October 2017 to September 2018, Ambani and his family donated Rs 437 crore (approximately US$61.4 million). Reliance Industries’ chairman was followed by Piramal Group’s chairman, Ajay Piramal, whose son recently married Ambani’s daughter. Piramal donated Rs 200 crore (approximately US$28.1 million) during the same period, in addition to giving Rs 71 crore (approximately US$10 million) for Kerela flood relief. Other notable philanthropists on this year’s list include the Premji, Godrej, and Nadar families.

Prince Charles unveils US$100 million fund for women empowerment in South Asia. The proposed fund, led by the British Asian Trust (BAT), will channel bond investors’ money to give half a million women and girls access to better education, jobs, and entrepreneurial opportunities over the next five years. The BAT will seek funding from the charity units of big banks for the initial risk investments and from national governments and other big donors for underwriting the final payment. Announcing the initiative, Prince Charles, called it the BAT’s “most ambitious venture to date.”

THE THINKERS

The Foundation Center and GuideStar merge to create Candid, a mega data portal. Two leading nonprofit and philanthropic intermediaries merge to create a data portal with a worldwide reach, combining years of research and experience in the social sector. The merge has been a decade in the making with top funders including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the Lodestar Foundation, and Fidelity Charitable Trustees’ Initiative. Brad Smith, president of the Foundation Center, will be president of Candid., and Jacob Herald, president of GuideStar, will serve as executive vice president. Operating with a budget of approximately US$38 million, Candid. will leverage both organizations’ complementary missions, datasets, and networks to be at the forefront of information-sharing in the nonprofit sector.

Rohini Nilekani and Vidya Shah call for more philanthropic giving at The Economic Times Women’s Forum 2019. According to a recent Oxfam report, Indian billionaires have added Rs 2,200 crore (approximately US$307 million) per day to their wealth, however in the “commitment to reducing inequality index,” India ranked 147 out of 157 countries. Rohini Nilekani and Vidya Shah, two leading female entrepreneurs and philanthropists, brought light to these numbers at The Economic Times Women’s Forum 2019, and they advocated for more giving to causes such as healthcare, education, and social protection. In accord, they encouraged greater engagement in philanthropy, calling on community members to devote more time and money to causes that address the country’s glaring inequality.

How nonprofits can help donor-advised fund philanthropists listen and learn. The use of donor-advised funds (DAF) has increased in popularity over the years as philanthropists seek greater impact through more organized and thoughtful forms of giving. As DAF donors work to enhance their giving portfolios, they should listen to feedback from the communities and individuals they seek to help. This enhanced communication between donors, intermediaries, and communities is an emerging trend in philanthropy, and DAF donors are poised to advance the practice of listening. The article highlights new approaches such as test-and-learn gifts, volunteering, survey and focus groups, and expert consultation.

THE NONPROFITS

Five Hong Kong charities that save the environment. Hong Kong Tatler highlighted five nonprofits for their work in environmental protection: Clean Air Network, EcoDrive Hong Kong, Ocean Recovery Alliance, Project C: Change, and The Nature Conservancy. As Hong Kong faces air quality and waste management challenges, awareness, education, and policy change will be pertinent in mitigating deleterious effects on the environment. Together, these nonprofits are raising awareness, connecting key stakeholders, and building more sustainable solutions for the future.

Nonprofits join in a campaign to reduce financial support for forest-risk businesses. According to new data released by the Forests and Finance campaign by the nonprofit Rainforest Action Network (RAN), Chinese, Japanese, Indonesian, and Malaysian banks were the biggest funders of forest-risk activities and the least likely to have internal policies restricting environmental damage. RAN is joining forces with two nonprofits, TuK Indonesia and Profundo, to campaign for less financial support for forest-risk businesses including unsustainable palm oil, pulp and paper, rubber, and timber developments, thereby reducing their negative impacts on the environment.

THE BUSINESSES

Marriot, the world’s largest hotel operator, partners with Generation Water to offer a sustainable alternative to plastic water bottles. According to the nonprofit Ocean Conservancy, as much as 60% of the plastic found in the ocean comes from five Asian countries including Thailand. The growing tourism industry in Thailand is taking a detrimental toll on the environment, and industry leaders are recognizing their need to take responsibility. Marriot International’s director of operations for Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Myanmar stated that the company understands its greater obligation and responsibility as its global footprint grows, and the hotel operator has partnered with the startup, Generation Water, to implement water plants that collect 4,000 liters of water a day from vapor condensation. Marriot has now been producing its own water for four months—reducing its number of used plastic bottles by more than 100,000 plastic bottles—and plans to expand water plants to all Marriot resorts in southern Thailand.

THE INNOVATORS

Venture fund, Quest Ventures, helps social organizations create and scale impact. A recent report by the Global Impact Investing Network has highlighted the significant growth of Southeast Asia’s impact investing ecosystem over the past decade, with US$904 million invested in the region by private impact investors. The venture fund firm, Quest Ventures, is joining other impact investors through its new impact fund to support startups addressing real-world problems. In the upcoming year, Quest Ventures plans to roll out their new fund and invest in 60 companies, 50 of them being social enterprises, in Southeast Asia to help entrepreneurs create and scale social impact in their communities. In addition to capital, the firm aims to support founders through their networks and mentorship services.

THE VOLUNTEERS

Number of volunteers in China hits hundreds of millions. According to the Ministry of Civil Affairs, more than 100 million Chinese have registered as volunteers by the end of 2018. Specifically, approximately 12,000 volunteering organizations were registered by the end of 2018, collectively providing more than 1.2 billion hours of community service. A statement from the China Volunteer Service Federation said that more efforts will be made to encourage volunteers’ participation in public service and social governance, as well as improving the quality of their service.

Who’s Doing Good?

28 January 2019 - 03 February 2019

THE GIVERS

Vogue India lists most generous billionaires who are using money to address the country’s income inequity. The list features India’s richest trailblazers in philanthropy from Ratan Tata, chairman of the Tata Trusts, to Sangita Jindal, chairperson of the JSW Foundation. The list also highlights two of India’s billionaires, Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw and Rohini Nilekani, who have signed the Giving Pledge, an initiative by Bill Gates and Warren Buffet that asks billionaires to donate at least half of their wealth to charity. These twelve Indian billionaires lead the way in applying financial acumen to enhance impact, and their work is an inspiration for others to dedicate their wealth to address their country’s most pressing social issues from education to healthcare development.

THE THINKERS

Rohini Nilekani urges social sector to speak up about failure. In the social sector, success stories are celebrated with awards and funding, and this leads social organizations to quieten stories of failure. Philanthropist Rohini Nilekani highlights how this fear of failure in the social sector inhibits innovation and growth. The path to change at scale in the social sector needs experimentation; thus, the acceptance of failure is essential for the success of the social sector. Nilekani calls for more candid communication between social entrepreneurs and the philanthropic community and points to leaders in the sector to collaborate more, pool resources and experience, and take bigger risks to pave way for greater social impact.

“How charities can avoid turning off potential donors.” Sara Kim and Ann L. McGill, authors of “Helping Others by First Affirming the Self: When Self-Affirmation Reduces Ego-Defensive Downplaying of Others’ Misfortunes,” explore a common dilemma that charities face. That is, “charities dealing with distressing topics such as illness, starvation, or war have to walk a fine line: they need to increase awareness of what they do without turning off potential supports and donors.” The solution, according to Kim and McGill, lies in “self-affirmation.” The authors claim that if people were reminded of who they are at heart, they might be less likely to downplay others’ misfortunes because they would not feel threatened or defensive. Through multiple behavioral psychological experiments, the researchers observed results in which participants who completed self-affirmation tasks were more likely to donate to nonprofits with no personal relevance or connection. For example, male participants who completed the self-affirmation task read about a breast-cancer charity for longer and donated more money to it.

THE NONPROFITS

Shanghai charity makes English fun for migrant children. In recent years, a number of organizations have emerged to assist the children of migrant workers in China’s major cities. Stepping Stones, a volunteer organization that helps migrant children build fluency in English, is one of the longest-running organizations with more than 300 regular volunteer teachers. In a recent interview, the founder of Stepping Stones highlighted the legislative challenges the organization faced and the need for clearer legal guidelines and regulations for nonprofits in China. As the population of migrant workers continues to grow, organizations addressing needs of migrant children will need more support from the government and funders to emulate the same quality and scale of services that Stepping Stones has achieved over the past ten years.

Charitable foundation in China reported having spent over 250 million yuan (US$37 million) fighting poverty in 2018. Established in 2007 by the Central Committee of the China National Democratic Construction Association to prompt enterprise engagement in poverty relief and other charitable projects, the China Siyuan Foundation for Poverty Alleviation announced that it had spent over 250 million yuan to fight poverty in 2018. According to the foundation, around two million individuals benefited from its various programs—from medical care to education. In 2019, the foundation plans to spend a further increased amount of 265 million yuan (approximately US$39.3 million) for poverty alleviation.

Two Greenpeace offices shut after donation row. Environmental group Greenpeace announced it had been forced to shut two of its regional offices in India and had asked its staff to leave due to a block on its bank account after accusations of illegal donations. Since 2015, Greenpeace has been barred from receiving foreign donations, and India’s financial crime investigating agency froze the group’s bank account in October 2018.

THE BUSINESSES

Cathay Pacific enhances community engagement strategy with two new programs. Hong Kong’s home airline has partnered with Social Ventures Hong Kong to develop two new community engagement programs. The first initiative, “Cathay Changemakers,” recognizes positive contributions by Hong Kong residents and promotes their causes across a wide audience including passengers, employees, and business partners around the world. The second initiative, “World As One,” partners with the nonprofit VolTra to provide underprivileged youth, including ethnic minorities and reformed drug addicts, the opportunity to travel on volunteer work trips. Cathay Pacific hopes to effect greater social change by leveraging its strength in connecting people and places and by collaborating with partners across different sectors.

Courts Singapore employees help spring-clean homes of elderly as part of the company’s new CSR program. Courts Singapore has partnered with the nonprofit Care Community Service Society (CCSS) to launch its new CSR program: Courts Charity Home. Through the new initiative, Courts will donate products to beneficiaries served by CCSS, including elderly, at-risk youth, and disadvantaged children. To kick off the program, staff volunteers delivered new home necessities to underprivileged elderly, matched their wish-list items (such as rice-cookers and electric kettles), and helped spring-clean their homes. The launch of Courts Singapore’s new CSR program last week ushers in Chinese New Year with a strong charitable spirit and deepened commitment to service and community.

THE INNOVATORS

Globe Telecom brings digital donation channel to nonprofits. Globe Telecom, a major provider of telecommunications services in the Philippines, made it easier for its over 8,000 employees and thousands of guests to donate to their chosen nonprofits through the use of GCash QR codes, raising almost ₱450,000 (approximately US$8,600) in just about two months. These funds were collected via the “Purpose Tree,” which was set up at the company’s headquarters in Manila. Any passer-by, including employees and visitors, can donate from their GCash account to their preferred charity by scanning the assigned QR code on the “Purpose Tree.” “In an era of mobile technology, potential donors want and expect to be able to act immediately. The use of GCash QR codes not only makes giving more convenient but also democratizes it. It puts control on the hands of the donors. They can choose their preferred NGO and donate any amount through GCash scan-to-pay online platform. This is much more efficient and larger in scale than traditional models like donation boxes and envelopes,” said Yoly Crisanto, chief sustainability officer and senior vice president for corporate communications at Globe Telecom.

Y Analytics launches to bring together capital and research for good. The impact measurement arm of TPG’s Rise Fund has branched off into an independent research organization—Y Analytics—to expand its research framework for informed decision-making to a larger network of investors. The organization will bring together leading economists, researchers, and capital allocators to evaluate and predict impact pre-investment and manage and measure impact thereafter. While the organization will build upon the Rise Fund’s “Impact Multiple of Money” system for informing capital in pursuit of change, it will also develop a research advisory council with partners including the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab at MIT and the World Resources Institute. From its headquarters in Washington, D.C., Y Analytics will translate its new findings to both bolster the research basis for informed impact investing and advance knowledge in the field.