Responding to Covid-19: Who’s Doing Good?

14 April 2020 - 20 April 2020

THE GIVERS
Individuals are funding initiatives that support nonprofits and hard-hit communities.

Laurence Lien, Singapore philanthropist, and his family donated SG$2 million earlier this month to aid 17 charities in Singapore affected by Covid-19. 

Adrian Cheng, executive vice-chairman of New World Development, launched a new Covid-19 initiative that will install 35 “Mask To Go” dispensers at designated NGOs in all 18 districts across Hong Kong. NGOs will provide contactless “Mask Redemption Cards” to pre-registered low-income families and disadvantaged groups. The dispensers will begin to operate by the end of April.

THE THINKERS
Organizations are collecting data to better understand the impact of Covid-19 on nonprofits and communities.

BRAC, the world’s largest nonprofit based in Bangladesh, published the findings from its Rapid Perception Survey on Covid-19 Awareness and Economic Impact survey of 2,675 individuals in Bangladesh. Among other key findings, the survey shows that the average household income is down 75% from the previous month, and that 96% of households are not receiving any government support.

Management and Sustainable Development Institute (MSD) launched its latest report, The effects of Covid-19 pandemic on civil society organizations in Vietnam. The study surveyed 101 organizations, with almost all (96%) reporting that their operations have been impacted as a result of the outbreak. Click here for the Vietnamese version.

THE NONPROFITS
Charities are stepping up their operations and joining forces to serve communities affected by Covid-19.

Hong Kong Jockey Club launched a number of initiatives to support those affected by Covid-19, earmarking HK$30 million (approximately US$4 million) for the distribution of more anti-epidemic packages to vulnerable groups, HS$42 million (approximately US$5.5 million) to provide free mobile internet data to underprivileged students to facilitate online learning, and a HK$50 million (approximately US$6.5 million) top-up its “Covid-19 Emergency Fund.”

The Asia Foundation is refocusing its work to help battle Covid-19 and support disproportionately impacted communities. For example, the foundation is expanding access to its “Let’s Read” library, Asia’s only free digital and multilingual library for children, to help improve access to education materials at a time when 9 out of 10 children in the world are out of school. Read more about the foundation’s other relief efforts, such as those in Myanmar, Pakistan, and Nepal here

International Justice Mission (IJM) has expanded rescue and awareness operations in response to issues exacerbated by Covid-19 in India and the Philippines, including online child trafficking and increased violence during lockdowns. IJM is also working with governments to provide food support, offer hand-washing trainings, and raise awareness about the virus.

A number of organizations in Pakistan are providing direct healthcare services to communities in need. This includes Indus Health Network, Alkhidmat Foundation, Kashmir Orphan Relief Trust, Patients’ Aid Foundation, and Ghurki Trust Teaching Hospital.

THE BUSINESSES
Companies are contributing to Covid-19 relief efforts and donating medical supplies, food and beverages, and other staples to affected communities. Some companies, such as Alibaba and ByteDance, are expanding their portfolio of response efforts with new initiatives.

B.Grimm, one of Thailand’s leading conglomerates, recently launched “B.Grimm Fights Covid-19 with Compassion” and donated over 46 million baht (nearly US$2 million) to relief efforts. Donations from the company have gone to hospitals and a number of charities in Thailand.

Oishi Group, a subsidiary of ThaiBev, launched the “Oishi Gives to Fight against Covid-19.” Through this campaign, the company is donating cash as well as food and beverages through the Thai Red Cross Society, which has totaled 24 million baht (approximately US$800,000) to date.

CP Group has donated more than US$29 million in Thailand to tackle Covid-19 and provided free food delivery to 88 hospitals across Thailand. Additionally, CEO Suphachai Chearavanont announced that the Group is committed to not making layoffs across the Group worldwide, will cover employee medical expenses, provide food to quarantined employees, and provide education loans for their employees’ children.

Carousell, one of the world’s largest digital marketplaces, launched “Covid-19 Free Ads for Charity,” among other response efforts. This initiative will offer up to SG$2 million (approximately US$1.4 million) of its advertising inventories for nonprofits in Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, and the Philippines helping affected communities. The initiative aims to help nonprofits gain more visibility and access to volunteers and potential donors.

DBS Bank pledged SG$10.5 million (approximately US$7.5 million) to help communities affected by Covid-19, both in Singapore and across the region. The DBS Stronger Together Fund will provide around 4.5 million meals and packages containing food and staples to affected individuals in Singapore, Hong Kong, China, India, Indonesia, and Taiwan. In Singapore, DBS is partnering with two local nonprofits in a SG$2.5 million (approximately US$1.8 million) plan to provide food for the elderly, low-income, and migrant workers.

Alibaba Group has published a factsheet, listing all of the donations and relief efforts of both the Jack Ma Foundation and Alibaba Foundation to date. The foundations also shared a coronavirus prevention and treatment handbook—available in 23 languages—which offers key insights from doctors, health care workers, and hospital administrators at the First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, who were at the frontline of the outbreak in China.

ByteDance recently published an overview of its Covid-19 response initiatives, categorized by country. Examples include contributions to Covid-19 relief funds, donating medical equipment, and creating online, multi-lingual training modules to help educate health workers around the globe.

Tsinghua University and China Vanke Co have joined together to establish the Vanke School of Public Health, aiming to boost talent training and scientific research and enhance China’s capacities in public health management. A special fund was set up with a donation of 200 million Vanke shares, valued at around 5.3 billion yuan (US$748 million) to the Tsinghua University Education Foundation. The former director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO), Margaret Chan Fung Fu-chun, was named the inaugural dean of the school. China Vanke and Dalian Wanda Commercial Management have also teamed up for a combined US$225 million in funding initiatives to help people affected by Covid-19.

Ping An Insurance Company donated US$1.5 million worth of Covid-19 medical supplies and technology to Indonesia. This includes medical technology that can generate accurate and rapid analysis of CT scans. This smart image-reading system has provided services to more than 1,500 medical institutions in China, including Hubei Province, and has assisted doctors with analysis in over a million CT scans for more than 20,000 patients. Earlier, Ping An donated more than US$20 million worth of supplies and cash in China, among a number of other donations and initiatives aimed at fighting the coronavirus outbreak in China.

Korean companies that conduct business in India are donating to help the country’s fight against Covid-19. Examples include: Samsung India, Hyundai Motor, and LG Electronics.

Pakistan’s Prime Minister Relief Fund for Covid-19 saw a commitment of Rs100 million (approximately US$700,00) from English Biscuits Manufacturers (EBM) and Rs50 million from Telenor (approximately US$300,000). Telenor has also pledged PKR1.6 billion (approximately US$10 million) in cash and supplies towards Covid-19 relief efforts. Jazz, the Pakistani telecommunications company, has also contributed PKR50 million (approximately US$300,000) to the PM Pandemic Relief Fund, part of the company’s total pledge of PKR1.2 billion (approximately US$7.5 million) for Covid-19 relief efforts.

PepsiCo Foundation pledged US$700,000 in grants to support the response efforts of nonprofits certified by the Pakistan Centre for Philanthropy (PCP), operating in more than 30 districts across Pakistan. Through its certification and Advised Grant Making services, PCP helps identify nonprofits with high standards of governance, financial management, and operations, building donor confidence and facilitating the deployment of funding. PepsiCo India, along with PepsiCo Foundation, is also providing 25,000 Covid-19 testing kits and over 5 million meals to support families impacted by the coronavirus outbreak in India.

Airbnb is partnering with the Philippine Disaster Resilience Foundation (PDRF) to expand its global Frontline Stays to the Philippines—an initiative to provide housing to 100,000 Covid-19 responders and relief workers. PDRF, together with partner hospitals, will help identify priority areas and healthcare workers in need of temporary housing.

THE TRUSTBREAKERS 

In this section, we usually share stories about scandals that are having negative repercussions for the social sector. With the fear and anxiety surrounding Covid-19, there are some trust-breaking stories circulating from price-gouging to faulty medical supplies. Fortunately, the stories of people being constructive during these times far outnumber them. We look forward to bringing more of these positive stories to you in the coming weeks.

RESOURCES

India Development Review analyzed a total of 75 resource announcements from the CSR community in India during the Covid-19 crisis. Combined, these contributions total more than ₹4,124 crore (nearly US$550 million). Of these, 89% is earmarked towards relief work, and of this, 54% is directed towards the Prime Minister’s PM-CARES Fund or state Chief Minister Relief funds.

Thank you to all the individuals and institutions stepping up to help fight Covid-19. Watch CEEW India’s #SupportYourSuperheroes video thanking the unknown heroes working to ensure the health and safety of their communities.

We’d also like to hear from you. How is your organization responding to Covid-19? Email us your stories at research@caps.org

The Effects of COVID-19 Pandemic on Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) in Vietnam

Management and Sustainable Development Institute (MSD)

This report provides an overview of the impact of Covid-19 on the social sector in Vietnam. It is based on a survey of 101 civil society organizations (CSO) conducted between 31 March and 10 April 2020. Almost all (96%) of CSOs report their operations are impacted as a result of the outbreak. Mobilizing funds and coordinating with others in the social sector has become more difficult. Some CSOs are adapting to be able to continue supporting their beneficiaries. Recommendations for how stakeholders can support CSOs during and after this outbreak are also discussed. Read it here: English, Vietnamese.

Doanh nghiệp cần đưa từ thiện phát triển vào chiến lược trung tâm

Motthegioi.vn

Ngày 23.1, Viện Nghiên cứu Quản lý Phát triển bền vững (MSD), Phòng thương mại châu Âu (EuroCham), Quỹ Đổi mới giáo dục phổ thông Việt Nam (VIGEF) và Tổ chức Cứu trợ Trẻ em quốc tế (SCI) phối hợp tổ chức hội thảo Tạo xu hướng – Dẫn dắt thay đổi.

Hội thảo tập trung vào chủ đề thúc đẩy từ thiện phát triển cho sự phát triển bền vững của doanh nghiệp, đặc biệt tập trung vào việc xây dựng các mô hình doanh nghiệp thân thiện với trẻ em.

Từ thiện phát triển là xu hướng?

Bà Nguyễn Phương Linh – Viện trưởng MSD chia sẻ, nói tới doanh nghiệp, người ta thường nghĩ và nói ngay tới lợi nhuận, tăng trưởng, chứng khoán, và bây giờ là công nghệ 4.0, hiếm khi truyền thông và các diễn đàn nói tới Philanthropy – từ thiện phát triển.

“Ở một khía cạnh nào đó, việc này khiến mọi người nghĩ rằng, từ thiện phát triển có lẽ chỉ là việc phụ, việc làm thêm của doanh nghiệp, đặc biệt là dành cho các doanh nghiệp lớn, dư dả chứ không mật thiết đối với sự phát triển của doanh nghiệp… “, bà Linh nói.

Tuy nhiên, theo chuyên gia này, trên thực tế thì từ thiện phát triển, cùng với xu hướng phát triển của xã hội, gắn bó mật thiết với doanh nghiệp. Thay vì nghĩ rằng “Khi nào doanh nghiệp lớn thì mới tham gia từ thiện phát triển”, hãy nghĩ ngược lại “Hãy đặt từ thiện phát triển, chia sẻ giá trị vào trung tâm chiến lược của doanh nghiệp để giúp doanh nghiệp xây dựng thương hiệu, năng lực cạnh tranh, văn hoá và phát triển lớn mạnh”.

Bà Mehvesh Mumtaz Ahmed – Giám đốc Nghiên cứu Trung tâm Xã hội và Hoạt động cộng đồng Châu Á (CAPS) cũng nhấn mạnh: “Từ thiện phát triển được xem là một nguồn lực lớn dành cho các tổ chức làm về phát triển ở châu Á, mà ở đó chính bản thân các tổ chức cần chứng minh được năng lực thực sự của mình”.

Theo khảo sát của CAPS, chỉ số đóng góp cho xã hội của các doanh nghiệp tại Nhật Bản, Singapore và Đài Loan xếp ở mức “thực hiện tốt” hay rất tốt bởi ở họ có sự khuyến khích từ phía chính phủ. Ví dụ như ở Singapore có chính sách khấu trừ thuế 250%, nếu như đóng góp 1 USD, bạn có thể nhận lại 2,5 USD.

Cũng theo kết quả của khảo sát này, cùng với Hong Kong, Hàn Quốc, Malaysia, Philippines, Sri lanka, Thái Lan thì Việt Nam là một trong những quốc gia và vùng lãnh thổ đang thực hiện tốt từ thiện phát triển.

“Một trong những điều cản trở các doanh nghiệp trong việc thực hiện đóng góp cho xã hội chính là thuế, sự khuyến khích từ chính phủ. Do đó, để đẩy mạnh chỉ số này cần có sự gắn kết giữa nhà nước và khối doanh nghiệp. Chính phủ cần tạo ra hành lang cho các doanh nghiệp bao gồm cả việc tạo sự khuyến khích hay khấu trừ thuế”, bà Mehvesh nói.

Con cá, cần câu

Bà Mevesh cũng cho biết, từ thiện phát triển và từ thiện nhân đạo đều giống nhau ở việc giúp đỡ người khác. Tuy nhiên, nếu như ai cũng có thể cho, làm từ thiện nhân đạo thì từ thiện phát triển cần có chiến lược lâu dài.

Ông Tomaso Andreatta – Phó chủ tịch EuroCham cũng đưa ra một ví dụ hình ảnh về sự khác nhau giữa 2 loại hình này chính là việc cho “con cá” hay cho “cần câu”. Từ thiện nhân đạo chính là việc cho “con cá”; còn từ thiện phát triển là việc cho “cần câu”.

Theo chuyên gia này, các doanh nghiệp của EuroCham cũng tham gia vào các hoạt động xã hội như việc giảm rác thải ở các doanh nghiệp. Đó vừa giúp nâng cao nhận thức cộng đồng và giải quyết vấn đề việc làm. Các doanh nghiệp cũng đã có quỹ để trả lương cho những người làm công việc phân loại rác.

Trên thực tế trong chuỗi giá trị chung, tổ chức phi chính phủ (NGO) và doanh nghiệp chưa thực sự tìm được tiếng nói chung. Các doanh nghiệp chưa thực sự tin lắm vào các NGO và các NGO lại thường không biết cách tiếp cận, nói chuyện với các doanh nghiệp. Do đó, cần có sự công nhận vai trò của nhau trong chuỗi giá trị chia sẻ đến từ cả doanh nghiệp và các NGO.

Quyền trẻ em và lợi ích doanh nghiệp

Bà Nazia Ijaz -chuyên gia Hợp tác Doanh nghiệp tại UNICEF Việt Nam khẳng định: “Quyền trẻ em trong nguyên tắc kinh doanh rất đa dạng chứ không chỉ là vấn đề lao động trẻ em hay an toàn lao động, đó còn là việc doanh nghiệp có các sản phẩm, dịch vụ, hoạt động ảnh hưởng tới trẻ em”.

Theo đó, doanh nghiệp thực hiện tốt quyền trẻ em sẽ tạo lập được giá trị thương hiệu và niềm tin, mang lại lợi ích lâu dài cho doanh nghiệp. Đây là xu hướng phát triển trở thành triết lý kinh doanh của doanh nghiệp trên toàn thế giới.

Tại hội thảo, ông Lê Quang Vinh – CEO NexEdu, đại diện nhóm khảo sát cũng đã chia sẻ kết quả ban đầu của cuộc khảo sát Doanh nghiệp thân thiện với trẻ em, do MSD và SCI phối hợp thực hiện trong năm 2018.

Có tới 91% doanh nghiệp tham gia khảo sát từng thực hiện các chương trình liên quan đến trẻ em, tuy nhiên chưa có tới 50% các doanh nghiệp vận dụng các nguyên tắc kinh doanh gắn với quyền trẻ em của UNICEF. Một điểm đáng lưu tâm nữa là rất nhiều doanh nghiệp chưa quan tâm tới các chương trình bảo đảm quyền trẻ em khi sản phẩm và dịch vụ của họ không liên quan tới trẻ em.

Đối với các doanh nghiệp mong muốn thực hiện “những điều tốt đẹp cho trẻ em”, điểm yếu chính của doanh nghiệp là “còn thiếu ý tưởng, loay hoay trong việc thực hiện và lồng ghép các chương trình đảm bảo quyền trẻ em trong doanh nghiệp.

Cùng với đó, các chương trình chủ yếu dừng lại ở các hoạt động từ thiện nhân đạo, phong trào hay ngẫu hứng chứ chưa đi sâu vào việc khắc phục các nguyên nhân cốt lõi hoặc các nhu cầu của trẻ em, từ đó đưa ra các giải pháp triệt để, hiệu quả và bền vững.

Để xem bài viết trên trang web, bấm vào đây

 

Tìm hiểu sâu hơn mô hình doanh nghiệp thân thiện với trẻ em

Giao Duc Thoi Da

Tham dự Hội thảo có hơn 40 đại diện MSD, EuroCham, VIGEF vàSCI, cũng như các Diễn giả quốc tế; và đại diện các tổ chức xã hội và các cơ quan báo chí quan tâm đến chủ đề của Hội thảo.

Phát biểu khai mạc, bà Nguyễn Phương Linh, Viện trưởng MSD chia sẻ: “Nói tới doanh nghiệp, chúng ta thường nghĩ và nói ngay tới lợi nhuận, tăng trưởng, chứng khoán, và bây giờ là công nghệ 4.0, hiếm khi truyền thông và các diễn đàn nói tới Philanthropy – từ thiện phát triển. Ở một khía cạnh nào đó, việc này khiến mọi người nghĩ rằng, từ thiện phát triển có lẽ chỉ là việc phụ, việc làm thêm của doanh nghiệp, đặc biệt là dành cho các doanh nghiệp lớn, dư dả chứ không mật thiết đối với sự phát triển của doanh nghiệp…

Tuy nhiên, trên thực tế, từ thiện phát triển, cùng với xu hướng phát triển của xã hội, gắn bó mật thiết với doanh nghiệp. Thay vì nghĩ rằng: “Khi nào doanh nghiệp lớn thì mới tham gia từ thiện phát triển”, hãy nghĩ ngược lại “Hãy đặt từ thiện phát triển, chia sẻ giá trị vào trung tâm chiến lược của doanh nghiệp để giúp doanh nghiệp xây dựng thương hiệu, năng lực cạnh tranh, văn hoá và phát triển lớn mạnh”.

Nói về từ thiện phát triển và xu hướng từ thiện phát triển tại Châu Á, bà Mehvesh Mumtaz Ahmed, Giám đốc Nghiên cứu, Trung tâm Xã hội và Hoạt động cộng đồng Châu Á (CAPS) nhấn mạnh: “Từ thiện phát triển được xem là một nguồn lực lớn dành cho các tổ chức làm về phát triển ở Châu Á, mà ở đó chính bản thân các tổ chức cần chứng minh được năng lực thực sự của mình”.

Theo khảo sát của CAPS, chỉ số đóng góp cho xã hội của các doanh nghiệp tại Nhật Bản, Singapore và Đài Loan xếp ở mức “thực hiện tốt” hay rất tốt bởi ở các quốc gia này có sự khuyến khích từ phía Chính phủ. Ví dụ như ở Singapore có chính sách khấu trừ thuế là 250%. Nếu như bạn đóng góp 1 đô la, bạn có thể nhận lại 2,5 đô la.

Cũng theo kết quả của khảo sát này, cùng với Hong Kong, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Sri lanka và Thái Lan, Việt Nam là một trong những quốc gia đang thực hiện tốt từ thiện phát triển. Một trong những điều cản trở các doanh nghiệp trong việc thực hiện đóng góp cho xã hội chính là thuế, sự khuyến khích từ chính phủ. Do đó, để đẩy mạnh chỉ số này cần có sự gắn kết giữa Nhà nước và khối doanh nghiệp. Chính phủ cần tạo ra hành lang cho các doanh nghiệp bao gồm cả việc tạo sự khuyến khích hay khấu trừ thuế.

Ông Đặng Tự Ân, Giám đốc Quỹ Hỗ trợ đổi mới giáo dục phổ thông Việt Nam (VIGEF) nhấn mạnh tầm quan trọng của việc đầu tư vào giáo dục đối với sự phát triển của đất nước. Để có thể phát triển giáo dục trong thời gian tới cần phát triển mô hình giáo dục 3 NHÀ: Nhà nước – Nhà doanh nghiệp – Nhà trường. Ông cũng cho biết, riêng đối với Quỹ, một tổ chức phi lợi nhuận, cũng tự vận động, tự xây dựng quỹ cho tổ chức mình để quay lại hỗ trợ cho các đối tượng hưởng lợi khác. Do đó, cần có sự hợp tác, phối hợp với doanh nghiệp để thực hiện hiệu quả các chương trình, dự án của Quỹ.

Tại Hội thảo, các đại biểu chia sẻ và mong muốn được tiếp tục tìm hiểu sâu hơn nữa về mô hình doanh nghiệp thân thiện với trẻ em, đặc biệt là doanh nghiệp từ thiện phát triển trong mảng giáo dục và có các hoạt động kết nối cụ thể để tạo nên một hệ sinh thái các tổ chức cam kết với từ thiện phát triển nói chung và từ thiện phát triển gắn với phát triển các mô hình doanh nghiệp thân thiện với trẻ em nói riêng.

Hội thảo kết thúc với thông điệp “Chúng ta ở đây để thảo luận các xu hướng mới, và lan toả truyền cảm hứng để bắt đầu thực hành và dẫn dắt các thay đổi, tạo ra các giá trị chia sẻ cho doanh nghiệp, tổ chức xã hội và phát triển cộng đồng”.

Để xem bài viết trên trang web, bấm vào đây.