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CAPS Spotlight: Who’s Doing Good

28 April 2021 - 12 May 2021

As cases continue to surge in India, ordinary citizens, charities and companies are working to mitigate the crisis. In many places, volunteers are filling the gaps by organizing charity drives and sourcing supplies. India’s younger generation is fighting the pandemic by setting up crowdsourcing apps and building online databases with real-time information on medical resources and oxygen availability across the country. Companies are continuing to aid the fight: Bajaj Group pledged an additional ₹200 crore (US$27 million); Accenture pledged US$25 million; Reliance Foundation is setting up an additional 1,000 bed facility in Jamnagar; tech companies from CRED to Google are also providing aid. While companies, charities, and ordinary citizens are stepping up, India’s ultra-rich are facing criticism for not giving more during this second wave.

Prime Minister Modi has asked NGOs and civil society groups to provide further help to medical professionals. However, nonprofits are saying that the FCRA amendments the government introduced last September have crippled the sector and limited their ability to access and distribute crucial foreign aid at this time. They are asking for FCRA requirements to be put in abeyance as the country battles the worst of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Thailand’s social sector is facing potential restrictions on foreign funding. In February, the Thai Cabinet approved a draft law in the name of creating more transparency in the social sector. The law has since drawn criticism from those in the sector, including human rights groups, and three United Nations Special Rapporteurs, who are concerned it would bring to heel the country’s NGOs. Section 6 of the draft law would place restrictions on organizations that receive foreign funding. This could have ramifications for the sector, as CAPS’ Doing Good Index 2020 found that 52% of social delivery organizations in Thailand receive foreign funding.

Philippine Disaster Resilience Foundation (PDRF) and the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI) begin construction of disaster, pandemic facility. The BPI Bayanihan Center will be a two-story, multi-purpose facility in Batangas City for people burdened by disasters and pandemics. The facility was intended to serve those severely affected by the Taal Volcano eruption in 2020, but its design has since been modified so that it can also function as a health care facility. The center will also be open for community programs and activities on occasion. Continue reading in The Manila Times →

NGO Rise Against Hunger and corporate partners join hands to end hunger in the Philippines. The number of people going hungry in the Philippines reached a record high during the pandemic, according to a Social Weather Stations survey. Rise Against Hunger stepped up to mobilize its staff and corporate volunteers to deliver food to various communities nationwide. With an ambitious goal to end hunger by 2030, the nonprofit’s corporate and government partnerships have been a key pillar in effectively reaching the poorest communities. Continue reading in The Manila Standard →

DBS Foundation doubles its grant program for social entrepreneurs to SG$3 million (approximately US$2.3 million). The philanthropic arm of DBS Bank has increased the funding pool of its grant program to support more social enterprises in the region as the pandemic persists. Social enterprises from Singapore, Hong Kong, China, Taiwan, India, and Indonesia are eligible to apply. Continue reading in the Singapore Business Review →

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