Doing Good Index 2020

Profiling Asia's Social Sectors: The Path Forward

The Doing Good Index 2020 lays bare the vital role of the social sector and how the right policies and practices can unleash an enormous US$587 billion per year towards it.

In the wake of Covid-19, the public, private, and social sectors must come together to work towards a stronger and more equitable Asia as we build our way out of this crisis. At a time when foreign funding is declining across the region, “Asia for Asia” philanthropy must fill the gap—and the Doing Good Index shows how. It provides a roadmap of the policies and practices that can unleash this capital by aligning incentives around doing good; mitigating the trust deficit; and maximizing private social investment flowing to the social sector.

The Index has increased its coverage from 15 Asian economies in 2018 index to a total of 18: Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam. It is based on original data gathered through surveying 2,189 social delivery organizations and interviewing 145 country experts across all 18 economies.

The Doing Good Index 2020 offers a way forward for governments, as well as private and corporate donors to meet the imperatives of building a vibrant social sector for a brighter Asian future. It is with great excitement that we bring you this second edition to help plot the way forward in a post-Covid-19 world. The next edition of the Index, planned for 2022, will reveal how these economies have fared following the Covid-19 pandemic.

View our press release here and sign up for our webinar on the key findings of the index on 9 July 2020, presented by CAPS’ Chief Executive and Director of Research: https://bit.ly/dgi2020-webinar

Interested in interacting with the Doing Good Index 2020 data and graphics? Stay tuned for the microsite–coming soon!

Responding to Covid-19: Who’s Doing Good?

25 May 2020 - 8 June 2020

THE GIVERS

The Majurity Trust, a philanthropic organization in Singapore, started the Singapore Strong Fund (SSF) to aid ordinary Singaporeans addressing challenges related to Covid-19. Backed by 10 main donors, it has already helped more than 52,800 people as well as rallied together over 3,700 volunteers. The SG$550,000 (approximately US$400,000) fund, finances up to 80% of a project’s cost or gives SG$5,000 (approximately US$3,600), whichever is lower.

THE NONPROFITS

Give2Asia is featuring local nonprofits across Asia, and how they’re addressing local needs during Covid-19. This includes examples from India, the Philippines, Korea, Cambodia, and Indonesia, among others.

THE BUSINESSES

In Bangladesh, Swiss-based pharmaceutical company Novartis, through its Bangladesh arm, has donated 28,000 PPEs to Swiss Red Cross and Bangladesh Red Crescent Society, worth BDT2.27 crore (nearly US$300,000).

In China, SC Johnson is donating ¥1 million (approximately US$140,000) to the Red Cross. It is also launching its 2020 SC Johnson’s Youth for a Green Life partnership with Shanghai Soong Ching Ling Foundation to help children deal with the pandemic. These efforts are part of a series of financial and in-kind donations—valued at over US$1 million—aimed at helping the Asia-Pacific region battle Covid-19.

In Hong Kong, Citi Foundation has donated US$150,000 to Feeding Hong Kong, which employs B2B logistics to channel surplus food stock to charities feeding those in need. The donation will benefit 5,600 households helping provide up to 14 days’ worth of food supply. The gift is accompanied by a donation of 110,000 face masks, which Feeding Hong Kong will distribute to vulnerable families. 

In India, LEGO Group, in collaboration with NITI Aayog and Save the Children, has introduced targeted initiatives in India to promote ‘Learning Through Play’ and support home-based learning during and after Covid-19. This is part of the LEGO Group and LEGO Foundation’s overall commitment of US$50 million globally to help children and their families during Covid-19. Yamaha Motor India donated Rs61.5 lakh (approximately US$90,000) to aid the fight against Covid-19. Rs11.5 lakh of this was earmarked for the PM Cares Fund.

In the Philippines, global shoemaker Bata will donate 2,000 pairs of shoes through SM Foundation to those battling the pandemic including healthcare workers, volunteers, and their families. The effort is part of a global commitment to donate one million pairs of shoes. In an interview with CNBC, Ayala Group Chairman and CEO, Jaime Augusto Zobel de Ayala, underscores the role of companies in helping fight Covid-19, noting, “The Covid crisis has created a new sense of public-private partnerships and unity.”

In Singapore, Citi announced three key initiatives in supporting Covid-19 relief efforts: providing food for marginalized communities, supporting students from disadvantaged backgrounds, and supporting migrant workers. In addition to a global employee donation-matching initiative, Citi has also raised US$1 million in the Asia Pacific in an effort to further support the United Nations Development Programme’s initiatives for vulnerable and marginalized communities.

In Sri Lanka, the Ministry of Education and Microsoft have partnered to advance remote learning during and after Covid-19. Microsoft will support the Ministry by providing students, teachers, ministry officials, and others stakeholders free access to Microsoft Office 365 tools.

In Taiwan, Taiwan Mobile, part of the Fubon Group, is offering tailor-made industry tech solutions to help enterprise customers (such as major hospitals) in the fight against Covid-19. Its enterprise communication system, M+ Messenger, is helping to ensure business continuity and data security, as well as provide support for hospitals to enhance efficient communication amidst the crisis. Taiwan Mobile also provided 15-day free internet access to over 20,000 students who need to learn from home during the pandemic, along with its other ongoing CSR initiatives aimed at bridging the digital divide. The Group also joined other companies in donating masks and hand sanitizer to help combat Covid-19.

In Thailand, the PepsiCo Foundation has partnered with Raks Thai Foundation to initiate three programs valued at THB18 million (approximately US$573,000) to help communities facing hardships due to the pandemic. The programs include “Give Meals Give Hope,” “Give Care to Farmers,” and “Give Care to Healthcare.” Across the programs, PepsiCo Foundation will donate 1 million meals, offer Covid-19 insurance and epidemic prevention gear to more than 3,900 farmers and their families, and donate critical medical equipment to hospitals.

THE INNOVATORS

UNESCAP and Good Return team up to provide a financial injection for women-led small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the time of Covid-19. United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP) and Good Return will support women-led SMEs in accessing the capital needed to support their businesses. The partnership will create a multi-country credit guarantee scheme across Cambodia, Nepal, Fiji, and Samoa. This comes at a time in which Covid-19 has exacerbated common challenges faced by women entrepreneurs, such as lack of assets to use as collateral and lower levels of digital literacy.

World Oceans Day prompts a push towards a ‘Blue Economy’ and new financing initiatives. According to the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Cambodia’s “Ocean Economy” is valued at US$2.4 billion (representing around 10% of its GDP) and directly and indirectly employs around 3.2 million workers. In order to protect this, the Asian Development Bank (ADB) has outlined four key financial initiatives to assist the country’s transition towards a more sustainable Ocean Economy. These include blue bonds, results-based lending, ocean risk insurance, and payments for ecosystem services. ADB has already committed US$5 billion to expanding its investments and technical assistance in ocean health and the blue economy over a five year period.

THE VOLUNTEERS

Volunteer army in Indonesia helps fight coronavirus with data, web. The Kawal Covid-19 (Guard against Covid-19) group constructs data models to guide the provincial governor in enacting stronger measures to mitigate the outbreak and to counter misinformation. Kawal’s 800 volunteers have emerged as an increasingly important source of information and guidance, particularly amidst patchy data and conflicting advice from Indonesia’s central government. Kawal emerged from volunteer groups that were set up to monitor 2014 and 2019 elections.

We’d also like to hear from you. How is your organization responding to Covid-19? Email us your stories at research@caps.org

Responding to Covid-19: Who’s Doing Good?

28 April 2020 - 11 May 2020

THE GIVERS
Individuals continue to donate cash, services, and supplies to Covid-19 relief efforts.

Hussain Dawood, chairman of Pakistan’s Engro Corporation and Dawood Hercules Corporation, pledged PKR1 billion (approximately US$6.3 million), in services, supplies, and cash to support various organizations in their fight against Covid-19.

Enrique Razon and his group of companies have donated Php 500 million (approximately US$10 million) in medical supplies. The company foundations of both Solarie and International Container Terminal Services have also contributed to other relief efforts, such as creating and retrofitting Covid-19 treatment facilities and donating food.

Senior administrators at Hong Kong’s nine main universities are donating portions of their salaries to Covid-19 relief funds. Presidents and vice-presidents at The Education University of Hong Kong, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, The University of Hong Kong, Lingnan University, and The Open University of Hong Kong will give 10% of their salary for the next 12 months. The Chinese University of Hong Kong president, along with seven pro vice-chancellors and vice-presidents, will give 15% of their monthly salaries from May to December.

THE THINKERS

CSIS (Center for Strategic and International Studies) Senior Adviser and Trustee Chair in Chinese Business and Economics Scott Kennedy examines the response of Chinese philanthropists to Covid-19. According to data from the YISHAN China Philanthropy Data Center, donations to public charities from late January to April 22 had reached over US$5 billion. The large majority (72%) had come from companies. The article looks at the breakdown of corporate donations to Covid-19 relief efforts by industry, firm ownership, and regional distribution.

Tao Ze, Founder and President of YISHAN, shares his observations on Covid-19 and its effect on the nonprofit sector in China. This includes insights into the impact of the crisis on operations and growth of nonprofits, government support for the sector, and what other countries can learn from China’s social delivery organizations.

THE NONPROFITS
Charities are stepping up their operations and joining forces to serve communities affected by Covid-19.

In 13 states in India, NGOs fed more people than government did during lockdown. According to a reply submitted by the central government to the Supreme Court: 84,260,509 people in India were provided meals during the lockdown that started on March 25. Overall nearly 37% people were fed by NGOs, but in 13 states, NGOs outperformed state governments in providing free meals. In nine states and union territories, NGOs fed more than 75% of the people who were provided meals during the lockdown. In Kerala and Telangana, all meals were exclusively provided by NGOs. To ensure uninterrupted supply of food grains for NGOs carrying out these services, the central government directed the Food Corporation of India to provide wheat and rice to NGOs at the open market sale rates without the e-auction process, which previously was only offered to state governments and registered bulk users.

THE BUSINESSES
Companies are contributing to Covid-19 relief funds and donating needed supplies to affected communities. Companies are also expanding their efforts to aid other countries where they operate.

In Japan, Sony announced that it will manufacture and donate medical face shields to hospitals to make up any shortfall in PPE (personal protective equipment) for healthcare workers. Sony will also help mass produce ventilators designed and developed by Acoma Medical Industry. Toyota, Suntory, Mitsubishi Motors, Teijin, Toray, Kao, Fast Retailing, and Shiseido have also pivoted their production lines or launched new operations to ease the shortage of medical supplies. Daiichi Sankyo announced a US$1 million donation, through the Japan Center for International Exchange, to the Covid-19 Solidarity Response Fund. LINE Corporation and its group companies have set forth 15 different initiatives to support its users in Japan, as well as an array of initiatives for users in Korea, Taiwan, Indonesia, and Thailand. These include facilitating donations, medical consultations, mental health counseling, and more. Mitsubishi Electric announced it will contribute JPY100 million (nearly US$1 million) to support frontline medical workers in Japan and children who are affected by the suspension of school. Eisai, the Japanese pharmaceutical company, is funding and donating PPE to healthcare institutions and organizations in Japan, 10 other Asian countries, the United States, and 8 European countries. 

In Korea, Oriental Brewery (OB) and L’Oreal, through their Korea arms, have contributed to relief funds, conducted volunteer activities, and donated supplies to help fight Covid-19.

In Indonesia, 13 Singaporean companies donated 100,000 masks and five tonnes of hand sanitizer to the city of Batam, where 11 of these companies operate. The effort was organized by Singapore’s Economic Development Board, and donations will go to frontline healthcare workers. Chinese iron and steel company Rockcheck Group and Indonesian conglomerate Rajawali Corpora joined forces and donated over a million surgical masks and gloves, after a previous donation of PPE, to support healthcare workers. The Rockcheck Group has donated 100 million yuan (US$14.1 million) so far to eight countries severely affected by the pandemic.

In Myanmar, telecom operator Ooredoo Myanmar donated over 13,000 pre-loaded SIM cards to regional and state governments to distribute to individuals in quarantine centers. Ooredoo is also providing toll-free call access to Consultation Call Centres for those seeking medical advice or information related to Covid-19. Korea’s SK Energy and SK Trading International have donated 4,000 Covid-19 test kits, worth around US$50,000, to Myanmar. POSCO International also donated 100 virus test kits that can run 10,000 tests to Myanmar’s Ministry of Health and Sports.

In the Philippines, Rizal Commercial Banking Corporation (RCBC) is aiding government relief fund distribution. RCBC was given the authority by the Monetary Board to accept government funds and assist in cash distribution under the social amelioration program for Covid-19. Downstream oil industry companies spent Php180 million (approximately US$3.6 million) through their CSR programs for Covid-19 relief efforts. They also donated PPE and gave free fuel to frontliners. The Philippines arm of Macau’s Suncity Group donated US$1 million worth of PPE to 40 public hospitals in Luzon province. LT Group has mobilized at least Php200 million (approximately US$4 million) worth of internal resources to aid frontline medical workers, healthcare institutions, and military personnel. Alliance Global Group companies have donated over Php603 million (approximately US$12 million) to support the country’s medical workers, NGOs, and impacted communities. It also waived rental charges for tenants in various Megaworld and Lifestyle Malls.

In Hong Kong, the business sector is contributing to the fight against Covid-19. A recent article in South China Morning Post highlights examples from the array of corporate relief measures—from offering financial support to providing hotel rooms and testing kits. Examples include relief efforts from HSBC, Standard Chartered Bank, New World Development’s hotel arm, Pentahotel Hong Kong, and a collaboration between Prudential and Prenetics. Bank of China (Hong Kong), through its BOCHK Centenary Charity Programme, donated HK$50 million (approximately US$6.5 million) to charitable organization Po Leung Kuk to support a total of 31 programs. Bank of China (Hong Kong) also sponsored the distribution of anti-epidemic packs to Po Leung Kuk’s beneficiaries. Hong Kong-based Baring Private Equity Asi (BPEA) announced a US$5 million Covid-19 Relief Fund to support affected communities across the region. BPEA Founding Partner and CEO, along with the firm’s four other investment committee members, will forego and contribute 100% of their annual salaries.

In India, Goodera, a Series B funded startup and India’s largest platform for CSR and employee volunteering, is leading India Inc’s efforts against Covid-19. Goodera has curated a list of real-time needs of medical institutions, NGOs, and state governments to facilitate coordination with companies looking to deploy CSR funds to vetted and approved organizations. Goodera has also enabled its massive network of volunteers to virtually lend management expertise to help NGOs execute projects and scale up their operations. Through its dedicated portal for Covid-19, Goodera has seen over 1 million volunteers sign up, and nearly 250,000 users are actively participating in Covid-19 relief campaigns. With CSR funds going directly to Covid-19, NGOs in India are looking at steep reduction in corporate support. FSG, a social action nonprofit, shares perspectives on how CSR funders and nonprofits in India can navigate funding needs amidst Covid-19. Interviews with 18 CSR leaders and corporate CEOs show that companies are giving to relief efforts—directly or through the PM CARES Fund and chief ministers’ relief funds. However, much of this funding has come from CSR budgets, with the remaining being prioritized for nonprofits addressing Covid-19 issues. This has left nonprofits focusing on other issues uncertain about the funding of their projects. Yet, the question on how to prioritize CSR funding during Covid-19 sees different responses. In Pakistan, the Securities and Exchange Commission of Pakistan (SECP) has advised all listed companies to divert their CSR funds towards fighting Covid-19.

THE INNOVATORS

Promoting resilient social enterprise ecosystems: Cambodian ecosystem enablers are pivoting their operations during Covid-19 to support the country’s entrepreneurs. For example, SHE Investments and Technovation Girls both have moved their accelerators and coaching services for female entrepreneurs online. Impact Hub Phnom Penh has coordinated with the private sector, universities, and ministry partners to run the HacKHtheCrisis virtual hackathon, which brings together different actors who are already working on addressing Covid-19. CAPS partners in Indonesia, PLUS and Instellar, have also moved training programs online in order to keep supporting social enterprise startups during lockdown. In Korea, CAPS partner Underdogs has also introduced online training. 

Precious One, an Indonesian social enterprise, employs disabled crafters for its handicraft business. This video by The Jakarta Post shows how the enterprise has pivoted during Covid-19 to produce cloth face masks and keep their business afloat.

THE TRUSTBREAKERS 

In this section, we usually share stories about scandals that are having negative repercussions for the social sector. With the fear and anxiety surrounding Covid-19, there are some trust-breaking stories circulating from price-gouging to faulty medical supplies. Fortunately, the stories of people being constructive during these times far outnumber them. We look forward to bringing more of these positive stories to you in the coming weeks.

We’d also like to hear from you. How is your organization responding to Covid-19? Email us your stories at research@caps.org

Business for Good goes digital!

Maximizing the Value of Social Enterprises in Asia

Through the Business for Good microsite, you can interact with our latest study, Business for Good: maximizing the value of social enterprises in Asia. Featuring a data dashboard, our microsite lets you filter and explore data from our survey of 584 social enterprises and interviews of 140 stakeholders across 6 Asian economies: Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Pakistan, and Thailand. Click here to access the microsite.

Responding to Covid-19: Who’s Doing Good?

14 April 2020 - 20 April 2020

THE GIVERS
Individuals are funding initiatives that support nonprofits and hard-hit communities.

Laurence Lien, Singapore philanthropist, and his family donated SG$2 million earlier this month to aid 17 charities in Singapore affected by Covid-19. 

Adrian Cheng, executive vice-chairman of New World Development, launched a new Covid-19 initiative that will install 35 “Mask To Go” dispensers at designated NGOs in all 18 districts across Hong Kong. NGOs will provide contactless “Mask Redemption Cards” to pre-registered low-income families and disadvantaged groups. The dispensers will begin to operate by the end of April.

THE THINKERS
Organizations are collecting data to better understand the impact of Covid-19 on nonprofits and communities.

BRAC, the world’s largest nonprofit based in Bangladesh, published the findings from its Rapid Perception Survey on Covid-19 Awareness and Economic Impact survey of 2,675 individuals in Bangladesh. Among other key findings, the survey shows that the average household income is down 75% from the previous month, and that 96% of households are not receiving any government support.

Management and Sustainable Development Institute (MSD) launched its latest report, The effects of Covid-19 pandemic on civil society organizations in Vietnam. The study surveyed 101 organizations, with almost all (96%) reporting that their operations have been impacted as a result of the outbreak. Click here for the Vietnamese version.

THE NONPROFITS
Charities are stepping up their operations and joining forces to serve communities affected by Covid-19.

Hong Kong Jockey Club launched a number of initiatives to support those affected by Covid-19, earmarking HK$30 million (approximately US$4 million) for the distribution of more anti-epidemic packages to vulnerable groups, HS$42 million (approximately US$5.5 million) to provide free mobile internet data to underprivileged students to facilitate online learning, and a HK$50 million (approximately US$6.5 million) top-up its “Covid-19 Emergency Fund.”

The Asia Foundation is refocusing its work to help battle Covid-19 and support disproportionately impacted communities. For example, the foundation is expanding access to its “Let’s Read” library, Asia’s only free digital and multilingual library for children, to help improve access to education materials at a time when 9 out of 10 children in the world are out of school. Read more about the foundation’s other relief efforts, such as those in Myanmar, Pakistan, and Nepal here

International Justice Mission (IJM) has expanded rescue and awareness operations in response to issues exacerbated by Covid-19 in India and the Philippines, including online child trafficking and increased violence during lockdowns. IJM is also working with governments to provide food support, offer hand-washing trainings, and raise awareness about the virus.

A number of organizations in Pakistan are providing direct healthcare services to communities in need. This includes Indus Health Network, Alkhidmat Foundation, Kashmir Orphan Relief Trust, Patients’ Aid Foundation, and Ghurki Trust Teaching Hospital.

THE BUSINESSES
Companies are contributing to Covid-19 relief efforts and donating medical supplies, food and beverages, and other staples to affected communities. Some companies, such as Alibaba and ByteDance, are expanding their portfolio of response efforts with new initiatives.

B.Grimm, one of Thailand’s leading conglomerates, recently launched “B.Grimm Fights Covid-19 with Compassion” and donated over 46 million baht (nearly US$2 million) to relief efforts. Donations from the company have gone to hospitals and a number of charities in Thailand.

Oishi Group, a subsidiary of ThaiBev, launched the “Oishi Gives to Fight against Covid-19.” Through this campaign, the company is donating cash as well as food and beverages through the Thai Red Cross Society, which has totaled 24 million baht (approximately US$800,000) to date.

CP Group has donated more than US$29 million in Thailand to tackle Covid-19 and provided free food delivery to 88 hospitals across Thailand. Additionally, CEO Suphachai Chearavanont announced that the Group is committed to not making layoffs across the Group worldwide, will cover employee medical expenses, provide food to quarantined employees, and provide education loans for their employees’ children.

Carousell, one of the world’s largest digital marketplaces, launched “Covid-19 Free Ads for Charity,” among other response efforts. This initiative will offer up to SG$2 million (approximately US$1.4 million) of its advertising inventories for nonprofits in Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, and the Philippines helping affected communities. The initiative aims to help nonprofits gain more visibility and access to volunteers and potential donors.

DBS Bank pledged SG$10.5 million (approximately US$7.5 million) to help communities affected by Covid-19, both in Singapore and across the region. The DBS Stronger Together Fund will provide around 4.5 million meals and packages containing food and staples to affected individuals in Singapore, Hong Kong, China, India, Indonesia, and Taiwan. In Singapore, DBS is partnering with two local nonprofits in a SG$2.5 million (approximately US$1.8 million) plan to provide food for the elderly, low-income, and migrant workers.

Alibaba Group has published a factsheet, listing all of the donations and relief efforts of both the Jack Ma Foundation and Alibaba Foundation to date. The foundations also shared a coronavirus prevention and treatment handbook—available in 23 languages—which offers key insights from doctors, health care workers, and hospital administrators at the First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, who were at the frontline of the outbreak in China.

ByteDance recently published an overview of its Covid-19 response initiatives, categorized by country. Examples include contributions to Covid-19 relief funds, donating medical equipment, and creating online, multi-lingual training modules to help educate health workers around the globe.

Tsinghua University and China Vanke Co have joined together to establish the Vanke School of Public Health, aiming to boost talent training and scientific research and enhance China’s capacities in public health management. A special fund was set up with a donation of 200 million Vanke shares, valued at around 5.3 billion yuan (US$748 million) to the Tsinghua University Education Foundation. The former director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO), Margaret Chan Fung Fu-chun, was named the inaugural dean of the school. China Vanke and Dalian Wanda Commercial Management have also teamed up for a combined US$225 million in funding initiatives to help people affected by Covid-19.

Ping An Insurance Company donated US$1.5 million worth of Covid-19 medical supplies and technology to Indonesia. This includes medical technology that can generate accurate and rapid analysis of CT scans. This smart image-reading system has provided services to more than 1,500 medical institutions in China, including Hubei Province, and has assisted doctors with analysis in over a million CT scans for more than 20,000 patients. Earlier, Ping An donated more than US$20 million worth of supplies and cash in China, among a number of other donations and initiatives aimed at fighting the coronavirus outbreak in China.

Korean companies that conduct business in India are donating to help the country’s fight against Covid-19. Examples include: Samsung India, Hyundai Motor, and LG Electronics.

Pakistan’s Prime Minister Relief Fund for Covid-19 saw a commitment of Rs100 million (approximately US$700,00) from English Biscuits Manufacturers (EBM) and Rs50 million from Telenor (approximately US$300,000). Telenor has also pledged PKR1.6 billion (approximately US$10 million) in cash and supplies towards Covid-19 relief efforts. Jazz, the Pakistani telecommunications company, has also contributed PKR50 million (approximately US$300,000) to the PM Pandemic Relief Fund, part of the company’s total pledge of PKR1.2 billion (approximately US$7.5 million) for Covid-19 relief efforts.

PepsiCo Foundation pledged US$700,000 in grants to support the response efforts of nonprofits certified by the Pakistan Centre for Philanthropy (PCP), operating in more than 30 districts across Pakistan. Through its certification and Advised Grant Making services, PCP helps identify nonprofits with high standards of governance, financial management, and operations, building donor confidence and facilitating the deployment of funding. PepsiCo India, along with PepsiCo Foundation, is also providing 25,000 Covid-19 testing kits and over 5 million meals to support families impacted by the coronavirus outbreak in India.

Airbnb is partnering with the Philippine Disaster Resilience Foundation (PDRF) to expand its global Frontline Stays to the Philippines—an initiative to provide housing to 100,000 Covid-19 responders and relief workers. PDRF, together with partner hospitals, will help identify priority areas and healthcare workers in need of temporary housing.

THE TRUSTBREAKERS 

In this section, we usually share stories about scandals that are having negative repercussions for the social sector. With the fear and anxiety surrounding Covid-19, there are some trust-breaking stories circulating from price-gouging to faulty medical supplies. Fortunately, the stories of people being constructive during these times far outnumber them. We look forward to bringing more of these positive stories to you in the coming weeks.

RESOURCES

India Development Review analyzed a total of 75 resource announcements from the CSR community in India during the Covid-19 crisis. Combined, these contributions total more than ₹4,124 crore (nearly US$550 million). Of these, 89% is earmarked towards relief work, and of this, 54% is directed towards the Prime Minister’s PM-CARES Fund or state Chief Minister Relief funds.

Thank you to all the individuals and institutions stepping up to help fight Covid-19. Watch CEEW India’s #SupportYourSuperheroes video thanking the unknown heroes working to ensure the health and safety of their communities.

We’d also like to hear from you. How is your organization responding to Covid-19? Email us your stories at research@caps.org

Social Innovation and Social Transition in East Asia

Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR) & Leping Social Entrepreneur Foundation

This collection of articles examines the varying ways in which social innovation has evolved in China, Hong Kong, Korea and Japan. The authors delve into the impact that each country’s history, culture, and political and economic systems have had on social innovation. Read it here.

The Palgrave Handbook of Global Philanthropy

Palgrave Macmillan

This publication is a comprehensive guide to the philanthropic sectors of 26 economies, including China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam. It provides an overview of the landscape of giving, the role that government and religion play, fiscal incentives, and the legal policies that shape philanthropic giving. It also seeks to understand what motivates individuals to give and why the level of giving varies across countries. Read it here.

Social Impact Landscape in Asia

Asian Venture Philanthropy Network (AVPN)

This series of reports documents the landscape for social investment across Asia. Each report maps a country’s socio-economic development context, government initiatives and investment indicators related to the social economy, and notable actors in the social investment landscape. Opportunities, challenges and recommendations for investors and intermediaries are also discussed.

Read it here:

Venture Philanthropy Practices in Asia: A Guide to Effective Capacity Building

Asian Venture Philanthropy Network (AVPN)

This report discusses best practices in social investing and venture philanthropy, and stresses the importance of both financial and non-financial support in making social purpose organizations investment- and impact-ready. It highlights 10 case studies of intermediaries from Asia and the strategies they employ in creating and delivering capacity building programs for budding social purpose organizations. Read it here.

Responding to Covid-19: Who’s Doing Good?

30 March 2020 - 05 April 2020

THE GIVERS
Philanthropists are donating supplies and funding initiatives supporting hard-hit communities.

Azim Premji, one of India’s most generous philanthropists, earmarked Rs1,125 crore (nearly US$150 million) to fight Covid-19. This charitable initiative is a joint effort by his eponymous foundation and Wipro, the IT company he founded. The Azim Premji Foundation is giving US$132 million, Wipro’s commitment is around US$14 million, and Wipro Enterprises around US$4 million. The funds will focus on providing immediate humanitarian aid.

Ratan Tata, Tata Trusts chairman and CAPS advisory board member, took to Twitter after he announced a Rs500 crore (approximately US$66 million) donation. In his message he stated, “In this exceptionally difficult period, I believe that urgent emergency resources need to be deployed to cope with the needs of fighting the Covid-19 crisis, which is one of the toughest challenges the human race will face.” Tata Sons and Tata Trusts have contributed a combined Rs1,500 crore (approximately US$200 million) to the fight against Covid-19.

Jack Ma and Joe Tsai, co-founders of Alibaba, have donated 2.3 million masks, 170,000 pieces of protective gear, and 2,000 ventilators to New York—the US epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic.

THE NONPROFITS
Charities are stepping up their operations and joining forces to serve communities affected by Covid-19.

Meer Foundation, an NGO that works to rehabilitate burn and acid attack survivors and empower women in India, is joining the fight against Covid-19. Along with Ek Saath-The Earth Foundation, it will provide food to over 5,500 families and set up a kitchen to produce 2,000 cooked meals for households and hospitals in India. Meer Foundation and Roti Foundation will provide 300,000 meal kits for 10,000 people per day for at least a month. Meer Foundation will also provide essential items and groceries to over 3,500 wage workers across Delhi.

China NGO Consortium for Covid-19 was jointly launched by foundations (including the Narada Foundation) and local NGOs on February 2, 2020. So far, 67 Chinese foundations and NGOs have joined the consortium to share information and technical knowledge, build the capacity of front-line NGOs, and mobilize funding. The consortium also fosters collaborating to coordinate the social sector’s response to the pandemic.

Singapore’s Community Chest, the fundraising arm of the government’s National Council of Social Service, is giving SG$3,000 (approximately US$2,100) to social service agencies to cope with outbreak-related expenses.

THE BUSINESSES
Companies are setting up their own Covid-19 relief funds, leveraging their resources to contribute to relief efforts, and supporting government initiatives. Others are offering medical supplies, food and beverages, and cash vouchers to affected communities. Companies across Asia are also taking a “business not as usual” approach to help relieve financial stress.

Setting up funds to help combat Covid-19.

Hang Lung Group established the Hang Lung Novel Coronavirus Relief Fund to support a series of volunteering activities to combat Covid-19. This includes delivering health and food kits to over 10,000 beneficiaries in Hong Kong and mainland China. Hang Lung also donated nearly US$1 million from the Fund to Leishenshan Hospital.

Bajaj Group committed Rs100 crore (nearly US$14 million) to the fight against Covid-19 in India. The funding will go towards multiple initiatives including upgrading healthcare infrastructure, testing, and procuring medical equipment. A significant portion will go towards an economic aid program in rural areas, which includes direct survival grants followed by a livelihood intervention using a revolving fund mode. 

Jollibee Group allocated nearly US$20 million for an emergency fund to provide its employees with the needed financial support during the quarantine period enforced in the Philippines. The fund covers all employees of the Group’s offices, stores, commissaries, and logistics centers, including senior citizens and people with disabilities assigned to stores under the joint employment program with local government units.

Gokongwei Group’s philanthropic arm, the Gokongwei Brothers Foundation, established a near US$2 million fund to help fight Covid-19 in the Philippines. Funds are earmarked for front-line healthcare workers and will be distributed among UP Medical Foundation, referral hospitals identified by the Department of Health, and other hospitals at the forefront of the fight against Covid-19. The Foundation has also distributed in-kind donations, including PPE.

The Metrobank and GT Capital Holdings Group of the Ty family pledged a US$4 million fund for initiatives that support the fight against Covid-19 in the Philippines. These initiatives will help produce test kits and purchase PPE for front-line healthcare workers.

Macquarie Group is joining the effort and allocating A$20 million (approximately US$13 million) to the Macquarie Group Foundation to support select nonprofits in their response and relief work for Covid-19. Alongside this, the Foundation is offering flexible funding to its grantees during this time.

Supporting government initiatives.

Aboitiz Group’s Ramon Aboitiz Foundation partnered with the Cebu City government and the Metropolitan Cebu Water District for #HUNAW, a handwashing campaign to help mitigate Covid-19. The initiative includes installing sinks in areas with low water supply and without clean handwashing facilities, as well as deploying handwashing trucks to reach impoverished communities and densely populated informal settlements.

PLDT, one of the Philippines’ largest telecommunications companies, teamed up with the Department of Health to establish an emergency hotline for Covid-19. PLDT chairman and chief executive officer Manuel V. Pangilinan said the collaboration is part of the company’s continuing efforts to fight Covid-19, noting that the hotline can help provide information and enable health authorities to deliver proper patient diagnosis and treatment.

India’s PM CARES fund, the Prime Minister’s Citizen Assistance & Relief in Emergency Situations Fund, has seen significant contributions from India’s private sector. Among the list of donations are: Rs500 crore (approximately US$67 million) from Reliance Industries; Rs400 crore (approximately US$53 million) from Aditya Birla Group; Rs150 crore (approximately US$20 million) from HDFC Group; Rs105 crore (approximately US$14 million) from LIC; and Rs50 crore (US$7 million) from Uday Kotak and Kotak Mahindra Bank.

Bangladesh Association of Banks donated Tk147.73 crore (approximately US$18 million) to the Prime Minister’s Relief and Welfare Fund for purchasing medical equipment to combat Covid-19.

Indonesian conglomerate Bakrie Group donated US$1.2 million to the Covid-19 taskforce led by the government’s National Disaster Mitigation Agency. Bakrie Group CEO and president director Anindya Bakrie stated that his company wanted to contribute to helping the government combat the Covid-19 outbreak in Indonesia as the pandemic had led to a “multi-dimensional crisis”.

Korean conglomerate LG will donate 50,000 diagnostic test kits to Indonesia to help the Indonesian government handle the spread of Covid-19.

Companies are leveraging their resources to help fight Covid-19. Examples include: Godrej Group, which launched the #ProtektIndiaMovement, a nationwide campaign to promote mass awareness around handwashing. As the country’s second-largest soap maker, the Group has pledged to ramp up its production to meet the demand for soap and sanitizers. Indorama Ventures (IVL), the Thai petrochemical company, is accelerating the production of a fiber to make 54 million masks in one month.

Companies are donating PPE, test kits, and other medical equipment to front-line healthcare workers and affected communities. Examples include: Hang Lung Group in Hong Kong and mainland China; Aboitiz Group, SM Group, and Filinvest Development Corp in the Philippines; Chaudhary Group in Nepal; and Sido Muncul and Mayapada Group and the Tahir Foundation in Indonesia.

Companies are donating food, beverages, and cash vouchers to communities affected by quarantine measures, such as low-income families and daily-wage earners. Examples include: Aboitiz Group’s food subsidiary Pilmico, Fruitas Holdings, Manila Water Foundation, Jollibee Group, and San Miguel Corporation in the Philippines; Chaudhary Group in Nepal; Sido Muncul and Mayapada Group and the Tahir Foundation in Indonesia; and Reliance Industries in India. Companies with large numbers of daily-wage earners in their ecosystem, like Zee Group in India, are committing to continuing their pay to ensure that families of daily-wage earners are not severely impacted during Covid-19.

Companies in the Philippines are joining forces through the Philippine Disaster Resilience Foundation (PDRF), a private sector disaster risk reduction and management network. PDRF has partnered with Globe Telecom’s e-wallet service Gcash, Fintech Alliance Philippines, Smart Communications’ e-wallet service Paymaya, and crowdfunding platform Gava Gives to purchase PPE for healthcare institutions. Another example is Project Ugnayan, a fundraising initiative led by top business conglomerates in cooperation with the PDRF and Caritas Manila. The initiative has reached a total of P1.62 billion (approximately US$33 million) in donations to aid those economically displaced by the ongoing Enhanced Community Quarantine in Greater Metro Manila.

Real estate companies are waiving rent so that tenants can lend more financial assistance to their employees. Examples include: SM Supermalls, Gokongwei Group’s Robinsons Land Corp, and Filinvest Lifemalls in the Philippines; and Central Pattana, Phuket Square, and Rangsit Plaza in Thailand.

Banks are setting forth financial relief measures for their customers. The Straits Times shares examples of banks around the world, including in Singapore and Malaysia, that are suspending loan repayments as Covid-19 upends financial stability for many borrowers. Another example is Gokongwei Group’s Robinsons Bank in the Philippines, which is offering its customers an extension of the payment period for their various loan products.

Another company taking a “business not as usual” approach is Coca-Cola Philippines. It canceled all of its commercial advertising activities and dedicated its advertising budget of US$2.94 million to supporting Covid-19 relief and response efforts. The funds will support front-line healthcare workers and economically challenged communities in the Philippines. The company also pledged support to its distributors who serve small sari-sari stores and carinderias.

THE SOCIAL ENTERPRISES
While social enterprises are joining the fight against Covid-19, they’re also bearing the financial brunt of the pandemic.

Malaysian Global Innovation & Creativity Centre surveyed 239 startups and social enterprises in Malaysia on the impact of Covid-19 on their business. About 25% said they will not be able to survive for longer than two more months, and a mere 3% are confident of surviving at all if Covid-19 continues for more than 12 months. When asked about the need for financial aid, 35% said they needed loans, 24% asked for grants or subsidies, and 4% asked for deferment in repayments. However, the majority (75%) were unaware or unsure of the various support instruments or incentives available during this time. For example, Malaysia’s central bank, Bank Negara, and CIMB Bank have both set forth financial relief measures for borrowers.

THE INNOVATORS
Social innovation is leading to new ways to mitigate the spread of Covid-19.

Thai hospitals deploy ‘ninja robots’ to aid coronavirus battles. The robots were first built to monitor recovering stroke patients but have been quickly repurposed to help fight Covid-19. So far, the robots have helped staff at four hospitals in and around Bangkok to reduce the risk of infection by allowing doctors and nurses to speak to patients over video. Later models will be designed to bring food and medicine to patients and to disinfect hospital wards.

THE TRUSTBREAKERS 

In this section, we usually share stories about scandals that are having negative repercussions for the social sector. With the fear and anxiety surrounding Covid-19, there are some trust-breaking stories circulating from price-gouging to faulty medical supplies. Fortunately, the stories of people being constructive during these times far outnumber them. We look forward to bringing more of these positive stories to you in the coming weeks.

RESOURCES

Azim Premji Foundation published a Covid-19 Pandemic Response Plan, a set of guidelines for civil society organizations in India looking to join the fight against Covid-19 and amplify their efforts. The Foundation brought together experts and practitioners from relevant fields to adumbrate areas of response in which organizations can contribute significantly to relief efforts, including assessing critical needs and conducting the “last-mile connect and delivery” of supplies and services to extend the reach of government relief measures.

We’d also like to hear from you. How is your organization responding to Covid-19? Email us your stories at research@caps.org