Corporate Philanthropy in Pakistan 2018: Mapping Corporate Sector Contribution Towards Government EHSAAS Program

Pakistan Centre for Philanthropy (PCP)

This report examines the philanthropic contributions toward social development by the corporate sector in Pakistan. It is the fifteenth edition in the series. The report describes the relationship between business and society, and how it impacts corporate giving. How the government’s Ehsaas Program for poverty reduction aligns with corporate giving is also discussed. The report makes several policy recommendations on ways to facilitate corporate giving and improve their effectiveness. Read it here.

Economic and Social Survey of Asia and the Pacific 2019: Ambitions beyond growth

UNESCAP

This report assesses the investment needed for the Asia Pacific region to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. It argues that stable economic growth in recent years has come at the cost of heightened inequality and environmental degradation. Prioritizing GDP growth at all costs is no longer feasible nor desirable. An estimated US$1.5 trillion is needed per year for the region to meet the SDG 2030 target. The report charts the course to achieving this, highlighting the economic policies that can support structural transformations, necessary investments into human capital and the environment, and the regional and cross-sector collaborations that should be maximized. Read it here.

Who’s Doing Good

27 October 2020 - 09 November 2020

THE GIVERS

Tanoto Foundation, Temasek Foundation International donate PCR equipment to GSI Lab. The latest World Health Organization (WHO) situation report on Indonesia highlighted the need for the country to increase its lab capacity to test suspected Covid-19 cases, as the country lags the Philippines and India in testing. Indonesia’s low testing rate has persisted as laboratories face problems ranging from limited testing equipment and delays in reported results. Genomik Solidaritas Indonesia Lab (GSI Lab), a social enterprise supporting the government’s Covid-19 testing efforts, currently has the capacity to conduct 5,000 tests daily. Thanks to this new donation of PCR equipment from the Tanoto Foundation and Temasek Foundation International, GSI Lab will be able to conduct an additional 600 tests per day.

After fight with prostate cancer, ex-banker Nazir Razak initiates awareness campaign. Former chairman of CIMB Group, Datuk Seri Nazir Razak will help lead a nationwide campaign against prostate cancer this November with the Urological Cancer Trust Fund of Universiti Malaya. A prostate cancer survivor himself, Razak is publicly sharing his experience in hopes that it will help the campaign raise awareness. The campaign is also providing knowledge enhancement programs for doctors and a dedicated website that contains health education resources for the public, patients, and healthcare professionals. According to the Malaysian National Cancer Registry, more than 60% of prostate cancer cases in the country are diagnosed at the advanced stage, while the comparable statistics are much lower in Singapore (25-30%) and the United States (less than 20%). The annual campaign will work to lower this number to 40% by 2025. Nazir Razak sits on CAPS’ Advisory Board.

THE NONPROFITS

With more Hongkongers needing food assistance during Covid-19, two local NGOs step up with volunteer delivery effort. Demand for food assistance in Hong Kong is greater than ever this year as residents face financial difficulty during Covid-19. This has prompted two local nonprofits—volunteer organization HandsOn Hong Kong and local food bank Feeding Hong Kong—to launch “Care Delivered”. This service aims to ensure food donations actually reach recipients, which has been hard with social distancing measures in place. Feeding Hong Kong will source the food, while HandsOn Hong Kong will organize volunteers to provide the manpower needed to distribute the food. “Care Delivered” has been selected as one of the 19 beneficiaries of Hong Kong’s annual charity fundraising campaign Operation Santa Claus (organized by South China Morning Post and Radio Television Hong Kong), and it will begin its delivery service in March 2021.

THE BUSINESSES

Microsoft, Accenture to nurture startups by social entrepreneurs in India. Microsoft and Accenture announced they will expand their joint initiative, announced earlier this year, on supporting startups in agriculture, education, and healthcare. The program will now also include startups solving critical business challenges related to sustainability and skilling. The program entails Microsoft Research India and Accenture Labs providing mentorship and support to help startups build scalable solutions and business models. This includes testing and validating proof-of-concepts and conducting design thinking sessions. Startups also receive resources from Microsoft and support in using these technologies to scale solutions.

THE INNOVATORS

Asia’s aspiring ‘green-collar’ workers hope for jobs in Covid-19 recovery. A new Singapore-based website is tapping into the growing demand for environmentally focused careers in Asia. It is billed as the first of such initiatives in Southeast Asia—a region that often comes under threat from natural disasters. The “Green Collar” portal lists jobs from renewable energy to farming and climate change in Singapore, Malaysia, and Thailand, with plans to gradually include job opportunities in other parts of the region. This comes as countries around the world are pledging to a “green recovery” from Covid-19. For example, Singapore said in August that it would create 55,000 green jobs over the next decade in the environment and agriculture sectors, while South Korea pledged in July to spend US$95 billion on green projects to boost the economy. The rising demand for green jobs coupled with stimulus measures aimed at concurrently revitalizing economies and fighting climate change augur well for the development of the ‘green sector’ in Asia.

THE VOLUNTEERS

CapitaLand promotes spirit of volunteerism among its employees. CapitaLand, one of Asia’s largest diversified real estate groups, continues to be a leading example in how employee volunteering schemes can amplify the impact of CSR initiatives by contributing time and expertise in addition to funding. CapitaLand was among the first companies in Singapore to formalize a three-day Volunteer Service Leave system in 2006. Since then, it has expanded its leave policy to include Volunteer No-Pay Leave, Volunteer Part-Time Leave, and other initiatives. Employees can also take paid leave for volunteering as part of the company’s International Volunteer Expedition (IVE) program, in which employees volunteer at one of CapitaLand’s 29 Hope Schools across China and Vietnam. Such policies and initiatives have helped drive employee volunteerism: CapitaLand employees have volunteered over 170,000 hours between 2006 and 2019.

IN OTHER NEWS…

After government refusal, some foreign nonprofits start diverting funds from cash distribution plan. As much as US$3 million was supposed to be spent in cash distribution by international NGOs in Nepal to communities affected by Covid-19. However, the Nepalese government introduced standards on relief distribution in April, which prioritized distribution of goods instead of cash. This article in The Kathmandu Post explores why the government has clamped down on cash distribution and how foreign NGOs are responding. In the meantime, these nonprofits are facing difficulty convincing donors to allow them to divert funds meant for cash transfers to be used for other relief materials. This has translated to delays in the distribution of much-needed support to those in need.

We’d also like to hear from you. How is your organization responding to Covid-19? Email us your stories at research@caps.org

Japan’s Civil Society from Kobe to Tohoku: Impact of Policy Changes on Government­-NGO Relationship and Effectiveness of Post-­Disaster Relief

Harvard University

This article explores the development of Japan’s civil society through the lens of citizen volunteerism and the role of nonprofits in natural disaster relief and reconstruction efforts. The development of civil society organizations in Japan occurred relatively late compared to Western countries. However, their numbers and civil society activism as a whole have surged in recent decades. The article explores the changing relationship between the state and civil society in Japan in light of these trends. Read it here.

Sustainable Finance in Japan

Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI)

This report examines the role of sustainable finance and investment in addressing climate change in Japan. It also discusses how the country can transition into a low-carbon economy. Policy recommendations for aligning the country’s finance sector with sustainable development and the Paris agreement are included. Read it here.

Dangers to Going It Alone: Social Capital and the Origins of Community Resilience in the Philippines

Greg Bankoff (Continuity and Change, Cambridge University Press)

This paper explores the evolution of mutual benefit associations and networks in the Philippines. It draws a comparison between the factors contributing to the decline of civil society in the United States and the same forces at work in the Philippines which led to the opposite outcome. It suggests that these associations and networks proliferate quickest in geographic regions most exposed to personal misfortune and community danger i.e. where the need is highest. Read it here.

Ways to Achieve Green Asia

Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI)

This publication provides a comprehensive overview of the environmental challenges Asia faces and the economic impact of climate change. It analyzes environmental regulations, governance and evaluation methodologies, and the growth of carbon markets in the region. Informative case studies on China and India are included. Read it here.

Business for Good in East Asia

Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR) & Leping Social Entrepreneur Foundation

This collection of articles examines the cross-sector collaborations driving social development and innovation in East Asia. Collaborative models deployed in China, Japan, Korea and Singapore are also discussed. Read it here.

Scaling Social Innovation in South Asia

Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR), BRAC & The Rockefeller Foundation

This collection of articles examines the lessons that BRAC and other leading social organizations have learned about successfully scaling social innovation in South Asia. The financial, political and organizational barriers that inhibit scaling are also discussed. Read it here.

Responding to Covid-19: Who’s Doing Good?

06 April 2020 - 13 April 2020

THE GIVERS
Individuals and foundations are donating supplies and funding initiatives supporting hard-hit communities.

Tanoto Foundation, founded by Indonesia’s Sukanto Tanoto, donated over 1 million gloves, 1 million masks, 100,000 coveralls, and 3,000 goggles to the national Covid-19 taskforce. The equipment will be distributed to hospitals in Jakarta, Medan in North Sumatera, and Pekanbaru in Riau.

Chaudhary Foundation has handed over 1,000 PCR testing kits to Nepal’s government to help accelerate the country’s efforts to mitigate Covid-19. The Foundation’s chairman, Binod Chaudhary, underscored the importance of collaboration with the government to contain the pandemic. The Foundation has also provided PPE and medical equipment to 48 health posts of seven provinces in Nepal. 

Sundar Pichai, chief executive officer of Google, donated Rs5 crore (approximately US$700,000) to nonprofit GiveIndia, matching an earlier donation from Google to GiveIndia. Google has set aside a total of US$800 million to help fight Covid-19 globally.

Kim Beom-su, founder and chairman of online company Kakao, donated his stocks worth ₩2 billion (approximately US$2 million) to help combat Covid-19 in Korea, and the company is matching the donation. Kakao has also been aiding Covid-19 relief efforts through its platform Together, and has raised approximately US$4 million as of April 7th.

In Korea, around 200 celebrities have contributed a total of over US$8 million in donations. K-pop groups are also spurring more donations to relief efforts. After K-pop group BTS singer SUGA donated ₩100 million (US$80,600) to Hope Bridge Korea Disaster Relief Association, 11,000 fans followed suit and donated a total of around US$500,000.

Government-led Covid-19 Funds in South Asia continue to see donations from local and foreign donors. Pakistani expats answer Prime Minister Imran Khan’s appeal for donations, with 900 expats donating a total of Rs45 million (approximately US$300,000) to the Prime Minister’s Covid-19 Relief Fund via the Ministry of Overseas Pakistanis and Human Resource Development’s online donation portal. Sri Lanka’s Covid-19 Healthcare and Social Security Fund established by President Gotabaya Rajapaksa has now reached Rs517 million (approximately US$3 million). India’s PM Cares Fund saw donations of US$13.2 billion from Prosus and US$13.2 million from JSW Group.

THE NONPROFITS
Charities are stepping up their operations and joining forces to serve communities affected by Covid-19.

Covid-19 and Chinese Civil Society’s Response. Stanford Social Innovation Review gives insight into the response from nonprofits, foundations, and businesses in China to Covid-19 and how civil society organizations from other regions can replicate their success.

India’s nonprofits are working closely with government to reach the most vulnerable communities during Covid-19, including NGO SEEDS, Akshaya Patra Foundation, Wishes and Blessings, and NGO Fuel.

EMpower (Emerging Markets Foundation), a global philanthropic organization, is working with a number of organizations on Covid-19 responses, such as the Teach Unlimited Foundation in Hong Kong and YKB in Indonesia, as well as providing flexible support to their grantees. The organization is also running the series #storiesofresilience, in which it features its partners who are helping fight Covid-19, such as the Indian NGO Saath.

THE BUSINESSES
Companies are funding relief efforts, supporting innovative startups, and leveraging their own resources to contribute to the fight against Covid-19.

Funding relief and vaccination efforts.

China Evergrande Group has set up a US$115 million effort that will support more than 80 researchers at top universities in Boston, including Harvard and MIT, and local biotechnology companies, to support research related to mitigating Covid-19.

Philippine Disaster Resilience Foundation (PDRF), a private sector disaster risk reduction and management network, raised around US$31 million in donations through its Project Ugnayan. This week PDRF announced that the project has reached over 7.6 million beneficiaries in Greater Metro Manila poor communities in just over three weeks.

TikTok, the Chinese video sharing platform, donated US$6.28 million for the government of Indonesia to buy protective equipment for front-line healthcare workers.

India’s Jaypee Group contributed Rs4.22 crore (over US$500,000) to the fight against Covid-19. This includes contributions to the PM Cares Fund, Uttar Pradesh CM CARE Fund, Madhya Pradesh CM CARE Fund, and Uttrakhand CM CARE Fund.

Supporting start-ups.

Singtel Group has set forth a Special Pandemic Support Grant as part of its Singtel Future Makers program. The cash support will go towards promising start-ups with innovative technological solutions that help the social sector tackle the challenges posed by Covid-19. Successful applicants will have the opportunity to join the main program with other Singtel Future Makers 2020 finalists addressing other themes and challenges in the latter half of 2020. 

Impact Investment Exchange (IIX) is launching its Emergency Financing Facility, a revolving fund to provide grants and working capital loans to select high-impact SMEs. IIX surveys indicate that over 74.4% of SMEs in its network will require additional capital in the coming months in order to stay on course with their growth and impact plans.

Leveraging and donating their own resources.

35 Indonesian manufacturers are ramping up capacity to produce more than 18 million pieces of Covid-19 protective gear by early May. Many are redeploying raw materials used for manufacturing other products towards making the gear. Examples include PT Pan Brothers, which has shifted its usual garment production to manufacture 10 million cloth masks every month; and garment manufacturer PT Sritex, which plans to increase its protective gear production to a monthly 1 million pieces from the current 150,000 units.

Vietnam’s Vingroup is producing ventilators through two of its subsidiaries. Vinfast, its automaker, and Vinsmart, its electronics arm, are shifting their production lines to produce 10,000 ventilators per month. Vingroup also committed US$4.3 million for medical equipment and testing through the Vietnam Fatherland Front Central Committee. Its retail arm, Vincom, also allocated US$13 million to support its tenants during Covid-19.

Huawei Malaysia donated four technology solutions to the Ministry of Health to aid communication between public health experts, front-line healthcare workers, public hospitals, and government as the country fights Covid-19.

Philippines’ financial industry and NGO groups have partnered for faster Covid-19 subsidy delivery. The joint initiative between NGOs, rural banks, cooperatives, and companies aims to provide alternative options to quickly disburse the government’s over P200 billion (approximately US$4 billion) emergency subsidy to over 18 million families.

Singapore gaming company Razer announced that it will set up Singapore’s first fully automated mask production. Other Singaporean firms, Frasers Property, JustCo, and PBA Group are supporting Razer’s initiative.

Thailand’s Charoen Pokphand Group invested US$3 million to build a factory in Bangkok to produce 100,000 surgical face masks per day to donate to healthcare workers. The group is also providing free food delivery to patients and staff at more than 40 hospitals across Thailand.

Indonesian food group Mayora pledged to donate 1 million masks, 1 million water bottles, and 1 million biscuit packs to medical front-liners across Indonesia.

CJ Indonesia, the Indonesian arm of Korean CJ Corporation, donated test kits, hand sanitizer, and food and milk packages worth US$255,000 to healthcare facilities and motorcycle taxi drivers, who are impacted by the government’s social restrictions amidst Covid-19.

THE VOLUNTEERS

While Bangladeshi celebrities are helping with resources and awareness, student-led voluntary organizations are supporting communities on the ground. For example, at the beginning of the outbreak, voluntary organization Bidyanondo Foundation sprayed disinfectant in public transport vehicles and made arrangements to feed 200,000 people living in slums in and around Dhaka. Donations from Bangladeshis abroad are also being distributed by volunteer organizations on the ground, for example, through the nonprofit Resource Coordination Network.

THE TRUSTBREAKERS 

In this section, we usually share stories about scandals that are having negative repercussions for the social sector. With the fear and anxiety surrounding Covid-19, there are some trust-breaking stories circulating from price-gouging to faulty medical supplies. Fortunately, the stories of people being constructive during these times far outnumber them. We look forward to bringing more of these positive stories to you in the coming weeks.

We’d also like to hear from you. How is your organization responding to Covid-19? Email us your stories at research@caps.org