Who’s Doing Good?

8 June 2020 - 21 June 2020

THE GIVERS

Singaporeans donated SG$90 million in first five months of 2020, equal to whole of last year’s donations. From January to May of this year, SG$90 million (approximately US$64 million) was donated to the Community Chest, the Community Foundation of Singapore’s Sayang Sayang Fund, and through the online donation platform Giving.sg. This amount was around the same as the total donations received by the Community Chest and Giving.sg in the entire year of 2019, according to a joint statement by the Ministry of Culture, Community and Youth and Ministry of Social and Family Development.

17th China Philanthropy Ranking released. The 17th edition of the annual China Philanthropy Ranking, supported by China’s Ministry of Civil Affairs and the China Charity Times, was released on June 16. This year’s ranking includes 118 philanthropists with a total of ¥5.45036 billion (approximately US$771 million) in donations, and 605 companies with a total of ¥1.245 trillion (approximately US$176 billion) in donations.

THE THINKERS

GIIN’s 2020 Annual Impact Investor Survey released. The Global Impact Investing Network (GIIN) released the 10th edition of its flagship report, which provides an overview of the global impact investing market. This report includes an updated market sizing analysis—estimating the current market size at US$715 billion—trends analysis, and insights on topics such as climate investing, the evolution of impact measurement, and policy developments over the past decade. CAPS’ recent study, Business for Good: maximizing the value of social enterprises in Asia, points out that impact investment in Asia is not yet living up to its full potential. While Asia accounts for nearly 50% of global GDP, GIIN’s latest report finds that only 14% of global impact investment is allocated to the region.

CEO of Singapore’s NVPC argues corporate giving during Covid-19 more than just a PR exercise. Melissa Kwee, CEO of the National Volunteer and Philanthropy Centre (NVPC), highlights examples of corporate efforts amidst Covid-19 that aligned a company’s purpose and expertise to enable more strategic giving. She cites Temasek, which leveraged its supply chain networks to provide hand sanitizers to all Singaporean households, and the Singapore Metal & Machinery Association, which mobilized a donation of 3,800 sets of PPEs. Kwee states that this is a step up from past CSR efforts that can sometimes be peripheral to the business or more reactive activities that lack a larger strategic intent.

THE BUSINESSES

Covid-19 covers 80% of CSR budget for India Inc., according to Crisil Foundation. According to the Foundation, CSR spending thus far has been in the form of contributions to the PM CARES Fund and other relief funds, as well as distribution of food, PPE, and other relief supplies to the needy. The Foundation’s chief operating officer stated, “Interestingly, the 130 companies analyzed by Crisil accounted for nearly 80% of the total CSR spend by all listed companies in fiscal 2019. Assuming other companies would have followed a similar path, India Inc. has already allocated over 80% of the annual CSR budget to address the pandemic. This could impact spending on other areas this fiscal year.”

ASEAN and The Asia Foundation, with support from Google.org, collaborate to equip 200,000 micro and small enterprises with digital skills and tools amidst the Covid-19 crisis. The ASEAN Coordinating Committee on Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises and The Asia Foundation have jointly launched ‘Go Digital ASEAN,’ supported by a US$3.3 million grant from Google’s philanthropic arm. The initiative will focus on expanding economic opportunities across ASEAN member states and mitigating the negative impact from the Covid-19 crisis. It aims to close the digital divide by equipping micro and small enterprises, as well as underemployed youth in rural and isolated areas, with crucial digital skills and tools.

Largest donation for Philippines’ fight against Covid-19 came from Project Ugnayan of the Philippine Disaster Resilience Foundation (PDRF) at US$29.1 million. PDRF, the Philippines’ major private sector vehicle and coordinator for disaster management, has made the largest contribution to the government’s Covid-19 response to date: US$29.1 million. The next biggest donors to the government’s relief efforts are USAID, San Miguel Corporate, and Unilab. Ayala Group, which took an active part in Project Ugnayan, has set forth an array of other relief efforts to tackle Covid-19 in the Philippines. Recently, Ayala Group donated an automated RNA Extraction machine and two RT-PCR machines to Southern Philippines Medical Center and other institutions, which will help Davao boost its testing capacity to a maximum of 1,000 tests per day.

Tzu Chi Foundation Indonesia raised Rupiah 500 billion (approximately US$36 million) towards fighting Covid-19. The six biggest donors to the Foundation’s Covid-19 initiative were Sinarmas, Djarum, Indofood, Astra, Agung Sedayu Group, and Artha Graha Peduli. The funds will be used to purchase various equipment needed to help handle the outbreak in Indonesia.

Excelerate Energy has become the key sponsor of the HOPE Foundation for Women and Children of Bangladesh to support the organization’s Covid-19 relief efforts at the Rohingya camp outside Cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh—home to more than a million refugees. The US company’s donation will provide up to 10,000 patients a year with outpatient and in-patient services, diagnostics, critical care, emergency transportation. It will also fund PPE for staff and surrounding community, staff training, and awareness programs.

Mastercard builds on Covid-19 response with commitment to expand financial inclusion initiative. The new commitment—an extension of Mastercard’s 2015 pledge to bring 500 million excluded people into the financial system—will bring a total of 1 billion people and 50 million micro- and small- businesses worldwide into the digital economy by 2025. This article shares examples of Mastercard’s financial inclusion initiatives in Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Thailand, and Vietnam.

American Express India has pledged INR 9 crores (approximately US$1.2 million) towards Covid-19 relief efforts. This includes contributions to the PM CARES Fund and nonprofits working in Covid-19 relief areas—such as mobilizing essential supplies, providing medical kits, feeding healthcare professionals, and developing and providing PPE to vulnerable communities. American Express India has also partnered in an initiative called ‘Hunger Heroes’ that will help distribute dry rations and essential supplies to the families of 10,000 food delivery riders impacted by the pandemic.

PwC Singapore launches new initiatives to support the community amidst Covid-19. The company is releasing “Digital Fitness for the World,” a learning app aimed at increasing digital acumen and upskilling, to the public for free from June 8 onwards. PwC is also working to help small and medium enterprises accelerate digitization with dedicated digital advisory services, solutions, and upskilling programs. Other Covid-19 initiatives from PwC include purchasing and distributing food to vulnerable communities.

THE INNOVATORS

Indonesia-based e-sports company helping fight Covid-19 through streaming, direct action. EVOS Sports, which operates across Southeast Asia, has initiated a number of efforts, including streaming matches and collaborating with influencers and social delivery organizations, to give back. For example, in Malaysia, EVOS Sports’ PUBG Mobile team played matches among themselves over a livestream and encouraged viewers to contribute to the “Give with Ikhlas” charity initiative, which has raised RM1 million (approximately US$230,000) so far. In Thailand and Indonesia, EVOS Sports’ athletes have also stepped on the ground to cook 3,000 meals for the underprivileged and donate 50,000 masks and surgical gloves.

We’d also like to hear from you. How is your organization responding to Covid-19? Email us your stories at research@caps.org

Responding to Covid-19: Who’s Doing Good?

21 April 2020 - 27 April 2020

THE GIVERS
Individuals are funding initiatives that support nonprofits and hard-hit communities.

Kenji Kasahara, founder of Mixi, established the ¥1 billion (approximately US$10 million) “Mitene Fund” to support organizations focused on aiding children and their families affected by Covid-19 in Japan. ETIC, a social sector intermediary and CAPS’ partner for our social enterprise study, is providing administrative support for the fund.

More than 150 investors and startup founders in India pool US$13 million for the “Act Grants” initiative to fund projects that fight Covid-19. The group includes prominent industry figures such as Nandan Nilekani, Vijay Shekhar Sham, and Kalyan Krishnamurthy, as well as investors from dozens of venture capital and private equity firms.

Thai billionaires answer Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha’s invitation to the Kingdom’s 20 richest individuals to set aside funding for the country’s fight against Covid-19. In addition to CP Group’s Chearavanont Family and B.Grimm’s Harald Link, the Osathanugrah Family, which owns Osotspa, is the latest to announce a THB100 million (approximately US$3 million) donation to fund Covid-19 relief efforts. Muangthai Capital’s Chuchat Petaumpai also announced THB110 million (approximately US$3.4 million) in aid, 200,000 relief kits for the jobless, and THB50 million (approximately US$1.6 million) for hospital equipment. Dr Prasert Prasarttong-Osoth, owner of Bangkok Airways and Bangkok Dusit Medical Services, promised THB100 million (approximately US$3 million) for digging ponds and artesian wells in Sukhothai province to help people fight droughts after the pandemic.

Britain’s Prince Charles launched a new Covid-19 emergency appeal fund for India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. Prince Charles announced the initiative in his role as the Royal Founding Patron of the British Asian Trust—a development organization fighting poverty across South Asia.

THE THINKERS

Creative public-private collaborations in Taiwan and South Korea bolster the fight against coronavirus. In the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Yuen Wai Hung, Marina Cortes, and Mara Hansen Staples give insight into how cooperation between public and private actors in these two Asian economies enabled a prompt response to the challenge of distributing urgently needed health products during Covid-19.

THE NONPROFITS
Charities are stepping up their operations and joining forces to serve communities affected by Covid-19.

Just Cause has highlighted key trends on how nonprofits are responding to Covid-19 from conversations with nonprofit leaders in Singapore. These include focusing on vital efforts to keep communities safe, finding news ways of working with communities, seeking flexible support from government and private funders, and investing in building resilience for the future.

THE BUSINESSES
Companies are contributing to Covid-19 relief efforts and donating medical supplies, food and beverages, and other staples to affected communities.

Sony established the US$100 million Sony Global Relief Fund for Covid-19 to support affected communities around the world. Through the fund Sony will provide support by assisting front-line healthcare workers and first responders, supporting children and educators, and supporting members of the creative community in the entertainment industry. US$10 million from the fund will go to the Covid-19 Solidarity Response Fund for WHO.

Rakuten Viber and WHO have joined forces to fight misinformation around Covid-19 through an interactive multi-language chatbot available globally. The bot also features a “Donate Now” button which prompts users to support WHO by donating to the Covid-19 Solidarity Response Fund. 

Japan-based Terumo Corporation is donating US$2.4 million in cash and products to support Covid-19 relief efforts worldwide. This includes a US$1 million donation to the Covid-19 Solidarity Response Fund for WHO. 

Fosun RZ Capital and Alpine Capital, two investors that have been investing in the Indian startup ecosystem, announced a donation of 20,000 Covid-19 testing kits to the country. The donation also saw participation from Fosun Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the Shanghai-based conglomerate Fosun International.

Hodo Group, the Chinese clothes manufacturer, announced that it will donate 1 million face masks to Cambodia to support the country’s fight against Covid-19. Since the outbreak, Hodo Group has refitted some of its assembly lines to produce anti-epidemic supplies, with a daily output exceeding 300,000 masks.

HP announced education partnerships around the world to support students and schools impacted by Covid-19. This includes partnering with Rise in China to build a home education ecosystem and launch an education printer package for students. Aside from these initiatives, HP has contributed US$3 million in grants and US$5 million in product donations to the fight against Covid-19 worldwide.

Unilever Bangladesh pledged BDT200 million (approximately US$2.5 million) to help the country fight Covid-19. The commitment includes donating products, improving public health infrastructure, and protecting the livelihoods of those who work across its value chain. Since the outbreak, Unilever Bangladesh has also donated BDT10 million (approximately US$150,000) worth of hygiene and household products. 

Shinhan Financial Group and Korean bio company Seegene donated 10,000 Covid-19 diagnostic kits and 300 protective suits to the Myanmar Ministry of Health and Physical Education.

Indorama Ventures, a Thai conglomerate, has expanded its Covid-19 relief efforts, including donations of medical equipment, food, and other needed resources to seven more countries: the United States, France, India, Brazil, Lithuania, Poland, and the Czech Republic. This comes after a THB2 million (approximately US$650,000) donation, through the IVL Foundation, to support the Covid-19 response in Thailand.

PepsiCo commits THB18 million (approximately US$600,000) to support Covid-19 relief efforts in Thailand. PepsiCo Thailand, Suntory PepsiCo Beverages Thailand, and the PepsiCo Foundation have partnered with the Raks Thai Foundation to reach the most vulnerable communities through the “Give for Hope” project. The initiative will operate for 3 months to distribute over 1 million meals to communities adversely impacted by Covid-19. It will also provide Covid-19 insurance and health protective items to more than 3,900 farmers and their families, as well as donate medical equipment to hospitals.

Coca-Cola India pledged over ₹100 crore (approximately US$13 million) for the Covid-19 fight. The donation aims to impact 1 million lives across India and includes support for healthcare workers.

THE INNOVATORS

Islamic Finance takes on Covid-19. UNDP outlines how zakat can play an important role by providing short-term emergency support to national and NGO support programs, and how sukuk and waqf can be important sources of capital for long-term recovery and resilience.

Indonesia sees rise in donations, volunteers, and social innovation. The country has seen a number of crowdfunding campaigns launched on local platforms, and by late March, 15,000 medical students from 158 universities had signed up to volunteer. Social innovation is also soaring with tech companies and universities contributing to the country’s fight against Covid-19 through a range of initiatives, from ultraviolet-disinfection booths and disinfectant chambers to robots for monitoring and communicating with Covid-19 patients. Home to a thriving startup and digital sector, Indonesia is also seeing new collaborations between various actors to aid the fight against Covid-19. 

THE TRUSTBREAKERS 

In this section, we usually share stories about scandals that are having negative repercussions for the social sector. With the fear and anxiety surrounding Covid-19, there are some trust-breaking stories circulating from price-gouging to faulty medical supplies. Fortunately, the stories of people being constructive during these times far outnumber them. We look forward to bringing more of these positive stories to you in the coming weeks.

We’d also like to hear from you. How is your organization responding to Covid-19? Email us your stories at research@caps.org

The state of social enterprise in Bangladesh, Ghana, India and Pakistan

British Council

This study spotlights the social enterprise sectors in Bangladesh, Ghana, India and Pakistan and quantifies their composition, social enterprises’ areas of operation, and prospects for growth. Insights are drawn from surveying 648 social enterprises across these four countries.

Read it here:

Venture Philanthropy Practices in Asia: A Guide to Effective Capacity Building

Asian Venture Philanthropy Network (AVPN)

This report discusses best practices in social investing and venture philanthropy, and stresses the importance of both financial and non-financial support in making social purpose organizations investment- and impact-ready. It highlights 10 case studies of intermediaries from Asia and the strategies they employ in creating and delivering capacity building programs for budding social purpose organizations. Read it here.

Business for Good in East Asia

Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR) & Leping Social Entrepreneur Foundation

This collection of articles examines the cross-sector collaborations driving social development and innovation in East Asia. Collaborative models deployed in China, Japan, Korea and Singapore are also discussed. Read it here.

Impact Investing in Asia: Overcoming Barriers to Scale

Oliver Wyman, Asian Venture Philanthropy Network (AVPN), Global Impact Investing Network (GIIN) & Marsh McLennan Insights

This report provides an overview of the characteristics that define impact investing in the region. It captures the experience of a diverse set of stakeholders working in the impact investing space in China, India, Indonesia, Japan, and the Philippines.

Impact investing is gaining traction in Asia, but the industry is still new compared to its western counterparts. This report shares how the region can do better. Read it here.

Financing the Future of Asia: Innovations in Sustainable Finance

FSG, Asian Venture Philanthropy Network (AVPN) & The Rockefeller Foundation

This report shines a spotlight on the innovative investment strategies that are being deployed in Asia to drive development. Globally, sustainable finance is expanding in terms of instruments deployed and sectors being invested in. This report highlights how these strategies are mobilizing private sector capital to address environmental and social challenges in Asia’s four largest economies—China, India, Japan and Indonesia. Read it here.

The Landscape for Impact Investing in Southeast Asia

Global Impact Investing Network (GIIN) & Intellecap Advisory Services

Southeast Asia is undergoing rapid development, but the region continues to face challenges. Impact investing is a growing practice and is seen as a means to generate positive social and environmental impact along with financial returns. This study examines the trends and landscape of impact investing in Southeast Asia. It outlines challenges and opportunities for impact investors and the political and economic factors that can inform investment decisions. The report provides an in-depth analysis of the three most active markets in the region–Indonesia, Vietnam and the Philippines–and a broader regional overview of Brunei, Cambodia, East Timor, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, and Thailand. Read it here.

The Landscape for Impact Investing in South Asia: Understanding the current status, trends, opportunities, and challenges in Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka

Global Impact Investing Network (GIIN) & Dalberg Global Development Advisors

This report analyzes the impact investing landscape in six South Asian countries: Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Impact investing aims to generate positive social and environmental impact alongside financial returns and is a growing practice in South Asia. This report provides independent country analysis and identifies regional trends, opportunities and challenges. Read it here.

Scaling Social Innovation in South Asia

Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR), BRAC & The Rockefeller Foundation

This collection of articles examines the lessons that BRAC and other leading social organizations have learned about successfully scaling social innovation in South Asia. The financial, political and organizational barriers that inhibit scaling are also discussed. Read it here.