CAPS Spotlight: Who’s Doing Good

07 July 2021 - 20 July 2021

Wipro commits an additional ₹1,000 crore (approximately US$134 million) of grants for Covid-19 relief. These funds will focus on universal vaccinations and build on the company’s donation of ₹1,125 crore (approximately US$150 million) in the early days of the pandemic. Wipro’s founder and chairman Azim Premji has been recognized as one of the world’s leading donors in Covid-19 relief efforts. Continue reading in The Times of India →

Corporates and foundations are pooling resources to support relief efforts as Southeast Asia’s Covid-19 infections surge. To aid relief in Indonesia, Temasek FoundationTanoto FoundationBakti Barito FoundationDBS Bank and a dozen other businesses are coordinating the sourcing and shipments of 11,000 oxygen concentrators. Indonesia’s largest tech company GoTo is leading efforts to develop a facility that will provide an uninterrupted oxygen supply directly from a production plant in East Jakarta, addressing severe shortages in hospitals. The Indonesian embassy in Singapore is also collecting donations and medical supplies from the Indonesian expat community with a target of raising US$1 million, half of which have been collected thus far.

Other economies are also receiving Covid-19 relief. Procter & Gamble is providing 300,000 care packs, worth SG$3.1 million (approximately US$2.3 million), to support migrant workers in Singapore. The Jack Ma Foundation and Alibaba Foundation announced further donations of essential medical equipment to seven Asian economies, including India and Vietnam.

Rotary and Tata Trusts announce a five-year collaboration to scale community interventions in India. The partnership will focus on water and sanitation, health, education, Covid-19 relief, economic empowerment and education, with an emphasis on women and children. The joint programs are aligned with the Government of India’s objective of achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals. With an existing overlap in interest and convergence of activities, the collaboration seeks to scale impact and reach more communities in need. Continue reading on the Tata Trusts website →

Xiaomi Corp. co-founder Lei Jun donates US$2.2 billion to charity. Lei transferred 616 million Xiaomi shares to the Xiaomi Foundation and Lei Jun Foundation, just as the company becomes the world’s second largest smartphone maker. With this donation, the billionaire joins the likes of other Chinese tech company founders in substantially growing their philanthropic giving. Continue reading in Bloomberg →

Philanthropist Rohini Nilekani and institutional investor Social Alpha invest ₹3.05 crore (approximately US$548,000) in DanaMojo, a payment solutions platform for NGOs. The investment will help DanaMojo grow the platform, and reduce the time, energy and cost for nonprofits in managing donations. Since its inception, DanaMojo has onboarded over 900 NGOs. Continue reading in The Economic Times →

Have a story to share? Contact us at research@caps.org.

Philanthropy for Sustainable Development in China 2020

UNDP & China Foundation Center

This report examines how philanthropy in China is contributing to meet the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) 2030 Agenda. Findings are underpinned by a quantitative analysis of the China Foundation Center’s database which contains nearly 100,000 charitable projects between 2015 and 2018. The report also showcases insights derived from in-depth interviews with philanthropic practitioners, and concludes with recommendations for policy advocacy, enhancing collaboration and boosting SDG financing. Read it here.

Corporate Philanthropy in Pakistan 2018: Mapping Corporate Sector Contribution Towards Government EHSAAS Program

Pakistan Centre for Philanthropy (PCP)

This report examines the philanthropic contributions toward social development by the corporate sector in Pakistan. It is the fifteenth edition in the series. The report describes the relationship between business and society, and how it impacts corporate giving. How the government’s Ehsaas Program for poverty reduction aligns with corporate giving is also discussed. The report makes several policy recommendations on ways to facilitate corporate giving and improve their effectiveness. Read it here.

Economic and Social Survey of Asia and the Pacific 2019: Ambitions beyond growth

UNESCAP

This report assesses the investment needed for the Asia Pacific region to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. It argues that stable economic growth in recent years has come at the cost of heightened inequality and environmental degradation. Prioritizing GDP growth at all costs is no longer feasible nor desirable. An estimated US$1.5 trillion is needed per year for the region to meet the SDG 2030 target. The report charts the course to achieving this, highlighting the economic policies that can support structural transformations, necessary investments into human capital and the environment, and the regional and cross-sector collaborations that should be maximized. Read it here.

CAPS Spotlight: Who’s Doing Good

02 March 2021 - 15 March 2021

In the latest for South China Morning Post, CAPS explains how China achieved its poverty alleviation goal by seasoning its ‘stone soup’ strategy. On February 25th, Xi Jinping announced that his signature campaign to eliminate absolute poverty was a success. CAPS’ Chief Executive Ruth Shapiro and Deputy Director of Advisory Services Angel Lin give insight into the four strategies—a focused campaign, aligned incentives, tracking poverty, and mobilizing resources—that helped China achieve this audacious goal. Continue reading in the South China Morning Post →

Family philanthropy in India has tripled since 2019, according to latest India Philanthropy Report. While other sources of private funding—foreign, corporate, and retail—remained stagnant, funding from individual philanthropists grew to approximately INR 12,000 crore (approximately US$1.7 billion) in FY2020. This accounts for almost two-thirds of the increase in funding during the pandemic. This rise in individual giving is welcome, as foreign funding saw its share of overall funding fall to 25% and corporate funding is set to decline. Continue reading in the Business World →

Singapore’s Temasek Holdings commits US$500 million to impact investing specialist LeapFrog Investments. This allocation by Temasek, the US$214 billion Singapore state-backed investment company, is the largest single commitment to a specialist impact investment manager, according to the Global Impact Investing Network (GIIN). Temasek hopes its commitment will encourage other large institutional investors to move into impact investing. Continue reading in the Financial Times →

Newly published report estimates 1 million social enterprises across South East Asia. The State of Social Enterprise in South East Asia, launched earlier this month by the British Council, collates research on social enterprises from Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. The report examines social enterprises’ activities, size and reach, as well as available government and financial support. CAPS also estimated there to be at least 1.2 million social enterprises in the six economies covered in Business for Good: Maximizing the Value of Social Enterprises in Asia. Continue reading in Pioneers Post →

Have a story to share? Contact us at research@caps.org.

Webinar: Asia Society Hong Kong Center Program Charting the Path Forward

Catching the world unaware, Covid-19 has sent the global economy and the lives of billions into a tailspin. In the wake of this pandemic, the public, private, and social sectors must come together to work towards a stronger and more equitable Asia as we build our way out of this crisis. At a time when foreign funding is declining across the region, “Asia for Asia” philanthropy must fill the gap—and the Doing Good Index shows how.

CAPS’ Co-Founder and Chief Executive Ruth Shapiro and Director of Research Mehvesh Mumtaz Ahmed present the key findings of the index and showcase how governments, philanthropists, companies and the social sector can work together for mutual benefit. This discussion was moderated by Ronnie C. Chan, Co-Founder and Chairman of CAPS and Chairman of Asia Society Hong Kong Center.

Responding to Covid-19: Who’s Doing Good?

25 May 2020 - 8 June 2020

THE GIVERS

The Majurity Trust, a philanthropic organization in Singapore, started the Singapore Strong Fund (SSF) to aid ordinary Singaporeans addressing challenges related to Covid-19. Backed by 10 main donors, it has already helped more than 52,800 people as well as rallied together over 3,700 volunteers. The SG$550,000 (approximately US$400,000) fund, finances up to 80% of a project’s cost or gives SG$5,000 (approximately US$3,600), whichever is lower.

THE NONPROFITS

Give2Asia is featuring local nonprofits across Asia, and how they’re addressing local needs during Covid-19. This includes examples from India, the Philippines, Korea, Cambodia, and Indonesia, among others.

THE BUSINESSES

In Bangladesh, Swiss-based pharmaceutical company Novartis, through its Bangladesh arm, has donated 28,000 PPEs to Swiss Red Cross and Bangladesh Red Crescent Society, worth BDT2.27 crore (nearly US$300,000).

In China, SC Johnson is donating ¥1 million (approximately US$140,000) to the Red Cross. It is also launching its 2020 SC Johnson’s Youth for a Green Life partnership with Shanghai Soong Ching Ling Foundation to help children deal with the pandemic. These efforts are part of a series of financial and in-kind donations—valued at over US$1 million—aimed at helping the Asia-Pacific region battle Covid-19.

In Hong Kong, Citi Foundation has donated US$150,000 to Feeding Hong Kong, which employs B2B logistics to channel surplus food stock to charities feeding those in need. The donation will benefit 5,600 households helping provide up to 14 days’ worth of food supply. The gift is accompanied by a donation of 110,000 face masks, which Feeding Hong Kong will distribute to vulnerable families. 

In India, LEGO Group, in collaboration with NITI Aayog and Save the Children, has introduced targeted initiatives in India to promote ‘Learning Through Play’ and support home-based learning during and after Covid-19. This is part of the LEGO Group and LEGO Foundation’s overall commitment of US$50 million globally to help children and their families during Covid-19. Yamaha Motor India donated Rs61.5 lakh (approximately US$90,000) to aid the fight against Covid-19. Rs11.5 lakh of this was earmarked for the PM Cares Fund.

In the Philippines, global shoemaker Bata will donate 2,000 pairs of shoes through SM Foundation to those battling the pandemic including healthcare workers, volunteers, and their families. The effort is part of a global commitment to donate one million pairs of shoes. In an interview with CNBC, Ayala Group Chairman and CEO, Jaime Augusto Zobel de Ayala, underscores the role of companies in helping fight Covid-19, noting, “The Covid crisis has created a new sense of public-private partnerships and unity.”

In Singapore, Citi announced three key initiatives in supporting Covid-19 relief efforts: providing food for marginalized communities, supporting students from disadvantaged backgrounds, and supporting migrant workers. In addition to a global employee donation-matching initiative, Citi has also raised US$1 million in the Asia Pacific in an effort to further support the United Nations Development Programme’s initiatives for vulnerable and marginalized communities.

In Sri Lanka, the Ministry of Education and Microsoft have partnered to advance remote learning during and after Covid-19. Microsoft will support the Ministry by providing students, teachers, ministry officials, and others stakeholders free access to Microsoft Office 365 tools.

In Taiwan, Taiwan Mobile, part of the Fubon Group, is offering tailor-made industry tech solutions to help enterprise customers (such as major hospitals) in the fight against Covid-19. Its enterprise communication system, M+ Messenger, is helping to ensure business continuity and data security, as well as provide support for hospitals to enhance efficient communication amidst the crisis. Taiwan Mobile also provided 15-day free internet access to over 20,000 students who need to learn from home during the pandemic, along with its other ongoing CSR initiatives aimed at bridging the digital divide. The Group also joined other companies in donating masks and hand sanitizer to help combat Covid-19.

In Thailand, the PepsiCo Foundation has partnered with Raks Thai Foundation to initiate three programs valued at THB18 million (approximately US$573,000) to help communities facing hardships due to the pandemic. The programs include “Give Meals Give Hope,” “Give Care to Farmers,” and “Give Care to Healthcare.” Across the programs, PepsiCo Foundation will donate 1 million meals, offer Covid-19 insurance and epidemic prevention gear to more than 3,900 farmers and their families, and donate critical medical equipment to hospitals.

THE INNOVATORS

UNESCAP and Good Return team up to provide a financial injection for women-led small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the time of Covid-19. United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP) and Good Return will support women-led SMEs in accessing the capital needed to support their businesses. The partnership will create a multi-country credit guarantee scheme across Cambodia, Nepal, Fiji, and Samoa. This comes at a time in which Covid-19 has exacerbated common challenges faced by women entrepreneurs, such as lack of assets to use as collateral and lower levels of digital literacy.

World Oceans Day prompts a push towards a ‘Blue Economy’ and new financing initiatives. According to the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Cambodia’s “Ocean Economy” is valued at US$2.4 billion (representing around 10% of its GDP) and directly and indirectly employs around 3.2 million workers. In order to protect this, the Asian Development Bank (ADB) has outlined four key financial initiatives to assist the country’s transition towards a more sustainable Ocean Economy. These include blue bonds, results-based lending, ocean risk insurance, and payments for ecosystem services. ADB has already committed US$5 billion to expanding its investments and technical assistance in ocean health and the blue economy over a five year period.

THE VOLUNTEERS

Volunteer army in Indonesia helps fight coronavirus with data, web. The Kawal Covid-19 (Guard against Covid-19) group constructs data models to guide the provincial governor in enacting stronger measures to mitigate the outbreak and to counter misinformation. Kawal’s 800 volunteers have emerged as an increasingly important source of information and guidance, particularly amidst patchy data and conflicting advice from Indonesia’s central government. Kawal emerged from volunteer groups that were set up to monitor 2014 and 2019 elections.

We’d also like to hear from you. How is your organization responding to Covid-19? Email us your stories at research@caps.org

Muhammad Yunus & Ruth Shapiro: Doing Good in an Uncertain World

As a significant portion of global wealth shifts into the hands of a few, Nobel Laureate Muhammad Yunus discusses the transformative power of social businesses in helping people escape poverty and fix, what he believes is a ‘broken economic system’. This discussion was hosted at the Commonwealth Club of California and moderated by CAPS’ Founder and Chief Executive, Ruth Shapiro.

Social Innovation and Social Transition in East Asia

Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR) & Leping Social Entrepreneur Foundation

This collection of articles examines the varying ways in which social innovation has evolved in China, Hong Kong, Korea and Japan. The authors delve into the impact that each country’s history, culture, and political and economic systems have had on social innovation. Read it here.

Poverty and Shared Prosperity 2018: Piecing Together the Poverty Puzzle

World Bank Group

This series provides the most up-to-date estimates and trends on global poverty and shared prosperity. The 2018 edition broadens the way poverty is defined and measured, introducing a multi-faceted measurement approach connected to household consumption and the international poverty line (US$1.90 per person per day). Lack of access to infrastructure and education is also included as a facet of poverty. Relative poverty within households, sliced by gender and age, is also analyzed. The report shows that countries in East and South Asia have made impressive progress in poverty reduction. The poverty rate in countries in East Asia and the Pacific dropped from 62% in 1990 to less than 3% in 2015. And the number of poor people in South Asia dropped from half a billion in 1990 to 216 million in 2015. Read it here.